plaque

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Related to bacterial plaque: subgingival plaque

plaque

1. Pathol any small abnormal patch on or within the body, such as the typical lesion of psoriasis
2. short for dental plaque

Plaque

A tablet, often inscribed, added to or set into a surface on the exterior or interior wall.

plaque

[plak]
(medicine)
A patch, or an abnormal flat area on any internal or external body surface.
A localized area of atherosclerosis.
(virology)
A clear area representing a colony of viruses on a plate culture formed by lysis of the host cell.

plaque

A tablet that is affixed to the surface of a wall or set into a wall; often inscribed to commemorate a special event or to serve as a memorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
116), whereas the proportions were found to be different between boys and girls for the following oral conditions: bacterial plaque, gingivitis, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies and restorations.
Deposits of grey-yellow bacterial plaque on the teeth in conjunction with erythema, edema, and bleeding of the gingiva are seen in gingivitis.
Sugar plus bacterial plaque forms acid, which attacks calcium.
A BAD breath (halitosis) usually results from a build up of bacterial plaque in the mouth or on the tongue.
Then vibrate those bristles to break up the bacterial plaque.
These fluctuations in hormone levels can cause an exaggerated response of the gums to bacterial plaque, which causes gum disease," and during these times extra vigilant home care and discussion with a dentist are needed to maintain oral health.
M PerioShield provides a unique, plaque-blocking technology that forms a shield to help prevent bacterial plaque from adhering to tooth and gum surfaces.
The bacterial plaque that continuously forms on the teeth is the main reason behind periodontal infections.
Bacterial plaque, a susceptible tooth surface and sugary food are the three factors that need to be present and interacting for decay to begin.
Since the early experimental gingivitis studies in the 1960s, the consensus of clinical research supports the concept that the initiation and progression of periodontal disease is due to bacterial plaque and its metabolic by-products.

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