Bacteriology

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Bacteriology

The science and study of bacteria, and hence a specialized branch of microbiology. It deals with the nature and properties of the bacteria as living entities, their morphology and developmental history, ecology, physiology and biochemistry, genetics, and classification.

The major subjects that have consecutively occupied the forefront of bacteriological research have been the origin of bacteria, the constancy or variability of their properties, their role as causative agents of disease and of spoilage of foods, their significance in the cycle of matter, their classification, and their physiological, biochemical, and genetic features. See Bacteria, Microbiology

Bacteriology

 

the study of bacteria; a division of the broader scientific discipline microbiology. Bacteriology is divided into a number of independent branches. General bacteriology studies the morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of bacteria, their mutability and genetics, evolution, distribution in nature, and so on. Medical and veterinary bacteriology studies the biology of pathogenic bacteria, methods of isolating and identifying them, and the phenomenon of immunity; it elaborates specific means for preventing and treating infectious diseases of man and animals. Agricultural bacteriology studies the role of bacteria in the formation of soil structures, in soil fertility, and in plant nutrition, and the processing of agricultural products (ensilage, fermentation, retting, and so on). Technical (industrial) bacteriology studies the processes of formation by bacteria of alcohols, organic acids, enzymes, amino acids, antibiotics, growth stimulants, and other substances.

bacteriology

[bak‚tir·ē′äl·ə·jē]
(microbiology)
The science and study of bacteria; a specialized branch of microbiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also in 1882, the German bacteriologist Franz Ziehl added a further modification to Ehrlich's method.
For a century and a half, notions of objectivity among clinical physicians, physiologists, and bacteriologists branded as irrelevant the rival concepts of statisticians.
Similarly, when the initial devastating epidemics of polio became increasingly virulent after the turn of the century, bacteriologists attacked this new ailment with gusto, expecting to generate knowledge of the disease's transmission and eventually produce vaccines and anti-toxins, as had been done so dramatically with smallpox, rabies, whooping cough, typhoid, diphtheria and tetanus.
In 1920, the Society of American Bacteriologists recommended that the organism be named after its discoverer, or Mycobacterium friedmannii.
The story starts with a return to the past when at the Association of Bacteriologists conference in Wellington in 1945, the profession first recorded that a university degree was the preferred entry qualification for staff to work in medical laboratories.
In the past decade, bacteriologists have searched for complex structures in bacteria by using techniques for tagging proteins with fluorescent markers.