bagpipe


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bagpipe,

musical instrument whose ancient origin was probably in Mesopotamia from which it was carried east and west by Celtic migrations. It was used in ancient Greece and Rome and has been long known in India. Some form of bagpipe was later used in nearly every European country; it was particularly fashionable in 18th-century France, where it was called the musette. Its widest use and greatest development was in the British Isles, particularly Northumberland, Ireland, and Scotland. The island of Skye was the home of a school for pipers. The Highland pipe of Scotland, the most well-known type, was a martial instrument and from it comes the modern great pipe; but at least six other types were once used in the British Isles. The basic construction of a bagpipe consists of a bag, usually leather, which is inflated either by mouth through a tube or by a bellows worked by the arm; one or two chanters (or chaunters), melody pipes having finger holes and fitted usually with double reeds; and one or more drones, which produce one sustained tone each and usually have single reeds, though the musette drones have double reeds (see reed instrumentreed instrument,
in music, an instrument whose sound-producing agent is a thin strip of cane, wood, plastic, or metal that vibrates as air is passed over it. The predecessor of these instruments is the Chinese sheng.
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). Associated with folk and military music, it has been neglected by composers, possibly because of its short range.

Bibliography

See T. H. Podnos, Bagpipes and Tunings (1974); T. Collinson, The Bagpipe (1975).

References in classic literature ?
Then they knocked up a little place for him at the bottom of the garden, about quarter of a mile from the house, and made him take the machine down there when he wanted to work it; and sometimes a visitor would come to the house who knew nothing of the matter, and they would forget to tell him all about it, and caution him, and he would go out for a stroll round the garden and suddenly get within earshot of those bagpipes, without being prepared for it, or knowing what it was.
There is, it must be confessed, something very sad about the early efforts of an amateur in bagpipes.
You want to be in good health to play the bagpipes.
Being a great sleeper, and fond of his bed, it is possible he would have snoozed on until his usual hour of rising in the forenoon, in spite of all the drums, bugles, and bagpipes in the British army, but for an interruption, which did not come from George Osborne, who shared Jos's quarters with him, and was as usual occupied too much with his own affairs or with grief at parting with his wife, to think of taking leave of his slumbering brother-in-law--it was not George, we say, who interposed between Jos Sedley and sleep, but Captain Dobbin, who came and roused him up, insisting on shaking hands with him before his departure.
More than 300 pupils will benefit from opportunities to learn Highland dance and bagpipes at schools in Derry and Strabane.
This programme will be delivered by Bready and District Ulster Scots Development Association who have successfully delivered a pilot project of highland dance and bagpipe tuition.
The Director General of the National Center for Bagpipes in Scotland said: "We are proud that one of RAFO personnel gets this International certificate, which allows her to train others onto all music performances".
If, like me, you can only cope with very small and infrequent doses of the bagpipes, you'd love them.
Craig attended twice weekly bagpipe rehearsals and joined Milingavi Pipe Band having spent four years with junior Paisley Pipe Band.
and Duncan Knight, of Edinburgh, Scotland, who play the Great Highland Bagpipe.
HAD it not been for the cost of tartan and bagpipes, Cleveland Police Band may never have become what it is today.
The textile part of the bagpipe is nowadays predominantly made of synthetic materials.