bakeapple


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bakeapple

Canadian the fruit of the cloudberry
References in periodicals archive ?
Bakeapples are amber and more expensive as they are harder to find and are a sweeter flavour.
Among visitors to the province, discussion about how bakeapples got their name [which Bill Casselman asserts is "a one-hundred percent Canadian word" (1998: 12)] is frequent, and often occurs around the supper or breakfast table at inns and B&Bs.
Bakeapples are said to be named by another linguistic misunderstanding.
He elaborated, "From bakeapples we learned how hard people work to collect them from the bogs.
Dave's exuberant response to bakeapples combines surprise at not being familiar with such a wonderful foodstuff, and pleasure in having finally "discovered" it.
Bakeapples (also known as bog-apple, yellowberry and cloudberry, particularly in Scandinavia, and baked apple berry), for example, composed of large drupelets or pericarps, have a form similar to raspberries and blackberries.
My visit on August 20, 2001, which coincided with the arrival of three tour buses, provided me the opportunity to explain what bakeapples are to a tourist from Quebec.
Not only are edible berries fundamentally healthful, but even hitherto unknown (to visitors) varieties, such as partridgeberries and bakeapples, come in familiar shapes, sizes and colours.
Look for roadside stands in midsummer, or pick your own blueberries, strawberries, partridgeberries or bakeapples (Karr 2002: 9).
On the headlands and in the bogs berries ripened in billions, wild currants, gooseberries, ground hurts, cranberries, marshberries, partridgeberries, squashberries, late wild strawberries, crowberries, cloudy bakeapples stiff above maroon leaves.