balance error

balance error

[′bal·əns ‚er·ər]
(computer science)
An error voltage that arises at the output of analog adders in an analog computer and is directly proportional to the drift error.
References in periodicals archive ?
FIGURE 2 shows the SPI machine's balance error warning message for a QFN that passes primary tolerance criteria, but fails component tolerance criteria.
When the test results were combined with those of the Standardized Assessment of Concussion and the Balance Error Scoring System, 100 percent of the concussions were identified.
But when he logged onto his PayPal account, he saw his balance listed as zero, correcting the balance error.
Similarly, the computerized DMS avoids weight-related errors, such as the wrong weight being dispensed owing to an arithmetic mistake (for example, when dispensing into multiple containers), a balance error, an incorrect potency/density calculation, an incorrect units conversion, an incorrect tare weight calculation or misreading a quantity (typically by transposing figures, such as reading 0.
Once all system, room, and plenum temperatures have reached steady state and the overall heat balance error is acceptably low (typically less than 10% for these experiments), the heat balance of the conditioned space can then be used to calculate the lighting heat gain to the space.
Their design must guarantee rapid automatic tool exchange and high performance functions such as the highest repeating accuracy, small balance error, high concentricity, high runout tolerance and position accuracy; and reduced centrifugal force influence by small radial dimensions and masses.
Symptom checklists, the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC), neuropsychological testing (paper-and-pencil and computerized) and the Balance Error Scoring System may be helpful tools in diagnosing and managing concussions but should not be used alone for making a diagnosis.
The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), which evaluates an athlete's ability to maintain postural stability, providing important information about loss of balance in an injured athlete.
Ignoring pressure drop in calculation of enthalpy differences, EBC(1), results in energy balance errors of 1-2%, rising to 3-4% for those runs with large AP's and small AT's.
There was a one point-per-second deduction if the following balance errors occurred before the participant completed five seconds on the mark: (1) the participant was unable to hold a static position while his or her foot was on the mark and (2) any part of the participant' s body other than the sole of the supporting foot touched the floor (Sports Information and Science Agency, 2000).
Today, we're no longer spending time looking for system errors, out of balance errors, problems with third-party interfaces, and system crashes," Williams says.