ballade


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ballade

(bəläd`), in literature, verse form developed in France in the 14th and 15th cent. The ballade usually contains three stanzas of eight lines with three rhymes and a four-line envoy (a short, concluding stanza). Also popular was the ten-line stanza with four rhymes and a five-line envoy. The envoy is used primarily as a summary or as a dedication or direct address to an important person. Ballades of Charles d'Orléans, François Villon, and Geoffrey Chaucer are well known.

ballade

1. Prosody a verse form consisting of three stanzas and an envoy, all ending with the same line. The first three stanzas commonly have eight or ten lines each and the same rhyme scheme
2. Music an instrumental composition, esp for piano, based on or intended to evoke a narrative
References in periodicals archive ?
King also offers an "Appendix: Poetic Verse Patterns" (308-09), defining the forms of the ballade, rondeau, sestina, sonnet, and villanelle, on (one conjectures) the assumption that modern readers are not familiar with these forms.
Dozens of pages of measures and bars from sheet music of Ballade No.
His discussion of Villon in Les Grotesques triggered a renaissance of that poet's reputation in France, with Paul Lacroix and Pierre Jannet publishing new editions of his poetry (1854 and 1876), Antoine Campaux producing a new study on Villon's life and works (1859), and Theodore de Banville popularizing his compositional methods among French "Parnassiens" through his Trente-stx ballades joyeuses pour passer le temps composees a la maniere de Francois Villon (1873).
It is possible that Carreno chose not to perform the Ballade because she may not have played it since her marriage (1892-94) to German pianist and composer Eugen d'Albert, who had this work in his repertoire and performed it in public.
The Ballade has been effectively sold out for more than six months now," explained Graham Eagle, director of sales and marketing at Honda Motor SA.
In order to justify his interpretation and demonstrate the meanings of musical gestures, Bellman offers a broad discussion of the context in which the Ballade was composed, the musical realities in which Chopin created it, and, in particular, the ballades from operas that enjoyed huge popularity at that time and with which the composer was perfectly familiar.
b c Devil's Bag (1981, Halo - Ballade, by Herbager).
The new 20-minute piece, entitled Ballade for Cello and Orchestra, conveys a "boy meets girl, boy gets girl, boy loses girl" love story.
The result of the fortuitous suggestion from the Phil is the Ballade for Cello and Orchestra, which gets its world premiere at Hope Street next week.
The Ballade pour Adeline hitmaker, who has recorded over 1,200 melodies, will hand over the proceeds of the concert to Al Noor Training Centre for Children with Special Needs.
Chopin invented the musical form known as the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, tude, impromptu and prlude.
The pianists played some of Chopin's music compositions such as mazurka, ballade, nocturne and impromptu (free-form musical composition promoted by the spirit of the moment).