balled and burlapped

balled and burlapped

In landscape architecture, a method of preparing a plant or tree for transplantation; the largest part of the root system is covered with a ball of soil and then wrapped in burlap (Hessian) for protection and ease of handling when it is moved to the site where it is to be planted.
References in periodicals archive ?
For most woody plants, the standard answer, for balled and burlapped plants as well as those sold in containers, is to dig a hole three times the diameter of the soil ball but no deeper than the depth of the root ball.
Bring home your balled and burlapped bet on the future.
and said, "Live Christmas trees with roots -- balled and burlapped, or potted in the nursery trade -- can be used in homes and then planted after the holidays in your yard to provide energy savings, beauty and other environmental benefits in the years to come.
However, most trees professionally grown by a reputable nursery, whether correctly dug and balled and burlapped or containerized, should not need to be staked.
All woody plants - nursery-grown or home-dug, balled and burlapped or container-grown - require time to acclimate themselves to their new site.
It seems likely the trees, which sustain some injury when balled and burlapped, give off "plant volatiles" that attract the beetles.
Balled and burlapped trees are usually transplanted from August to October.
Balled and burlapped trees are bought during the dormant season, so have no leaves.