balsam fir

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balsam fir,

common name for the evergreen tree Abies balsamea of NE North American boreal forests. It has small needles and cones and is used for lumber. It is also called Canada balsamCanada balsam,
yellow, oily, resinous exudation obtained from the balsam fir. It is an oleoresin (see resin) with a pleasant odor but a biting taste. It is a turpentine rather than a true balsam.
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, as is the resin it produces, which is used as an adhesive in optical lenses and glass slides. Balsam fir is classified in the division PinophytaPinophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called gymnosperms. The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Pinopsida, order Coniferales, family Pinaceae.

balsam fir

A softwood tree with coarse-grained wood, used for interior trim. See also: Wood
References in periodicals archive ?
paper birch (Betula papyrifera), and American basswood (Tilia americana); rarely, balsam fir and white pine (Pinus strobus) were also co-dominant.
We used Arc-View (Environmental Systems Research Institute 2002) to select hardwood management units large enough to accommodate a square 36-ha plot, then visited those units in random order for the purpose of selecting our 16 sites, with four in each of the following understory categories: (1) minimal understory vegetation, (2) deciduous-dominated understory vegetation with sparse balsam fir, (3) understory vegetation with moderate balsam fir density, and (4) understory vegetation with high balsam fir density (Fig.
We calculated mean stem density, percent cover, and height for both balsam fir and deciduous understory species from the 18 quadrats in each plot.
5), positively weighted all balsam fir variables and small-tree density, and negatively weighted deciduous understory and large-tree density (Table 1).
6 more BTBWs per 36 ha (low estimate: 2002 point counts; high estimate: 2002 banding data) on plots averaging 27% balsam fir understory cover than on plots with sparse balsam fir (Table 2).