balsam fir

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balsam fir,

common name for the evergreen tree Abies balsamea of NE North American boreal forests. It has small needles and cones and is used for lumber. It is also called Canada balsamCanada balsam,
yellow, oily, resinous exudation obtained from the balsam fir. It is an oleoresin (see resin) with a pleasant odor but a biting taste. It is a turpentine rather than a true balsam.
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, as is the resin it produces, which is used as an adhesive in optical lenses and glass slides. Balsam fir is classified in the division PinophytaPinophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called gymnosperms. The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Pinopsida, order Coniferales, family Pinaceae.

balsam fir

A softwood tree with coarse-grained wood, used for interior trim. See also: Wood
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, you may need to trim the tenons on the truss supports down a bit to ensure that the tenons on the end of the balsam fir side rails remain on 8-inch centers.
4 balsam fir side rails--84 inches long, 4-5 inches in diameter
Based on these criteria, two study sites qualified as both Aspen-Conifer and Aspen-Hardwood cover-type groups, but they had higher proportions of balsam fir and were placed in the Aspen-Conifer cover-type group.
Some balsam fir existed as an upper canopy tree, individually spaced and with crowns limited to the upper portions of the stems.
As a result, the tree rings indicate, these extra animals grazed very heavily on balsam firs between 1988 and 1991, the two ecologists report.
About two hours later Peter Kunigonis, who lives in the Lake Avenue area of Worcester, was reaching the top of a path going into the parking area of Maple Hill Farm with an approximately 8-foot-tall balsam fir.
When it comes to colonizing unfriendly territory, temperate interlopers are no match for their northern neighbors--especially black and white spruce, tamarack, and to a lesser extent balsam fir.