bandersnatch


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bandersnatch

imaginary wild animal of great ferocity. [Br. Lit.: “Jabberwocky” in Through the Looking-Glass]
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Since the Publisher's Note indicates that Bandersnatch abridges The Company They Keep, it is worthwhile to compare the two books.
Beware, lad, the dire Jabberwock, With its scabrous and scurrilous talk, And let no beamish word Rile the cross Jubjub Bird, And no frumious Bandersnatch stalk
Effects accelerated by Nvidia GPUs include the mist and lightning emitted by Jabberwocky the dragon, the appearing and disappearing effects of the Cheshire Cat, and the dust and destruction caused by the hot-tempered Bandersnatch.
Some elements, such as the first appearance of the Bandersnatch, might be just a teeny bit scary for very sensitive tots.
After a thrilling encounter with the deadly Bandersnatch she finds herself at a chaotic tea party and a reunion with more-than-a-little-bonkers Mad Hatter (a nicely loose-limbed Depp).
The topics include shunning the Frumious Bandersnatch, a clarification of a misunderstanding of Keynes' definition of money, and divorcing art from science in modern economics.
As Carroll saw it, the frumious Bandersnatch was a mythical beast intent on the assault of an adolescent boy, thwarted at the last moment by his victim unexpectedly producing a sword.
The Afghan Bandersnatch," feature-length animated film noir,
Lewis Carroll would even create several just for children, including the Jabberwock and the frumious Bandersnatch.
I've been to the Bandersnatch in Phoenix, the Heathman in Portland, Ore.
Bandersnatch Brew Pub on Fifth Street starts filling up 4 hours before kickoff; patrons spill out from the pub onto the adjacent volleyball court, enjoying kielbasa and ale in the mild night air.
apatheia (a medical word used by Beckett), athambia (hapax legomenon in Beckett), Babbitt (the name of a literary 'hero'), bandersnatch (a 'Lewis Carroll' word), bang, sb.