Barber

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Barber

Samuel. 1910--81, US composer: his works include an Adagio for Strings, adapted from the second movement of his string quartet No 1 (1936) and the opera Vanessa (1958)

barber

[′bär·bər]
(meteorology)
A severe storm at sea during which spray and precipitation freeze onto the decks and rigging of ships.
References in classic literature ?
To all this the barber gave his assent, and looked upon it as right and proper, being persuaded that the curate was so staunch to the Faith and loyal to the Truth that he would not for the world say anything opposed to them.
Nay, gossip," said the barber, "for this that I have here is the famous 'Don Belianis.
In carrying so many together she let one fall at the feet of the barber, who took it up, curious to know whose it was, and found it said, "History of the Famous Knight, Tirante el Blanco.
This that comes next," said the barber, "is the 'Diana,' entitled the 'Second Part, by the Salamancan,' and this other has the same title, and its author is Gil Polo.
This book," said the barber, opening another, "is the ten books of the 'Fortune of Love,' written by Antonio de Lofraso, a Sardinian poet.
He put it aside with extreme satisfaction, and the barber went on, "These that come next are 'The Shepherd of Iberia,' 'Nymphs of Henares,' and 'The Enlightenment of Jealousy.
This large one here," said the barber, "is called 'The Treasury of various Poems.
This," continued the barber, "is the 'Cancionero' of Lopez de Maldonado.
The 'Galatea' of Miguel de Cervantes," said the barber.
The curate was tired and would not look into any more books, and so he decided that, "contents uncertified," all the rest should be burned; but just then the barber held open one, called "The Tears of Angelica.
asked the Sultan with a smile; but seeing that the barber had some reasons for his question, he commanded that the tale of the hunch-back should be told him.
The Sultan and all those who saw this operation did not know which to admire most, the constitution of the hunchback who had apparently been dead for a whole night and most of one day, or the skill of the barber, whom everyone now began to look upon as a great man.