Barber

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Barber

Samuel. 1910--81, US composer: his works include an Adagio for Strings, adapted from the second movement of his string quartet No 1 (1936) and the opera Vanessa (1958)

barber

[′bär·bər]
(meteorology)
A severe storm at sea during which spray and precipitation freeze onto the decks and rigging of ships.
References in classic literature ?
The truth is, as I believe I have since found out, that they have no barber shops worthy of the name in Paris--and no barbers, either, for that matter.
Hoot, hoot, hoot," said the barber, "nae kind of a man, nae kind of a man at all;" and began to ask me very shrewdly what my business was; but I was more than a match for him at that, and he went on to his next customer no wiser than he came.
On Sunday morning, after breakfast, when Billy was starting to go to the barber shop, she led him into the bedroom, whisked a towel aside, and revealed the razor box, shaving mug, soap, brush, and lather all ready.
I once prevailed on the barber to give me some of the suds or lather, out of which I picked forty or fifty of the strongest stumps of hair.
This,"--continued the barber,--"is the tale I related to the Caliph, who, when I had finished, burst into fits of laughter.
When it was what seemed to him the proper time he entered the village and went to Don Quixote's house, which he found all in confusion, and there were the curate and the village barber, who were great friends of Don Quixote, and his housekeeper was saying to them in a loud voice, "What does your worship think can have befallen my master, Senor Licentiate Pero Perez?
As he had twenty times touched at Leghorn, he remembered a barber in St.
Then Grandfather amused his children and himself with fancying all the different sorts of people who had occupied our chair while they awaited the leisure Of the barber.
His thick black moustaches, curled every morning with hot tongs by the barber at the corner of the quay, seemed to hide a perpetual smile.
And the barber would go on to describe with sar- donic gusto, how that stranger in mourning had been seen exploring the country, in carts, on foot, taking everybody into his confidence, visiting all the inns and alehouses for miles around, stopping people on the road with his questions, looking into the very ditches almost; first in the greatest excite- ment, then with a plodding sort of perseverance, growing slower and slower; and he could not even tell you plainly how his son looked.
Why, really," said the physician, with an amusing consciousness of his own resemblance to the loquacious barber of the Arabian Nights, "this is very interesting.
There were two places at which I could borrow money; a barber shop and a saloon.