barcarole


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barcarole

, barcarolle
1. a Venetian boat song in a time of six or twelve quaver beats to the bar
2. an instrumental composition resembling this

Barcarole

 

the original name of the songs of Italian, primarily Venetian, boatmen (gondoliers). Later, any musical work (such as a song, piano piece, or choral piece) associated with boating.

The barcarole is sometimes called a gondola song. The music is usually light, lyric, and dreamy. The tempo is moderate, and the measure is 6/8 or 12/8. The melody of the barcarole is distinguished by its smoothness; elements of musical expressiveness are often used in the accompaniment. The composers of the most famous vocal barcaroles include Schubert and M. I. Glinka. Composers of barcaroles for the piano include Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, and Rachmaninoff. Barcaroles are also found in several Italian and French operas.

E. M. TSAREVA

References in periodicals archive ?
She has played her "reinterpretations" of songs by such bands as Echo & the Bunnymen in the emptied galleries of the Malmo Konsthall, and a barcarole from the opera The Tales of Hoffman under a bridge in Munster.
Known largely for the Act I barcarole for Lakme and her serving girl, which famously became the television calling-card for British Airways some years ago, and the flamboyant coloratura of the Act II Bell Song, the opera is rarely revived these days.
Music moves like the air and its elements, moves through or rises and falls in time, and the barcarole (taking its name from the gondolier, who takes his name from the boat itself) is both literal and metaphorical instantiation of such movement.
Philipsz doubles herself in singing both parts of a duet, the barcarole (a gondolier's song) from The Tales of Hoffmann, Jacques Offenbach's opera inspired by the classic gothic fiction of E.
And, in 1991, She performed on a recording of Bernstein's Arias and Barcaroles, which won a coveted GRAMMY award.