bare rock

bare rock

[¦ber ¦räk]
(navigation)
In U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey terminology, a rock extending above the plane of mean high water.
References in classic literature ?
On our right, over a shoulder of bare rock, I saw the level blue of the sea.
It is the country of the wolf and the isard, of the brown bear and the mountain-goat, a land of bare rock and of rushing water.
At night, just as the Northern Lights were winking and flashing through the fog, Kotick climbed a bare rock and looked down on the scattered nurseries and the torn and bleeding seals.
And it was very silent, too, as there were no birds to sing or squirrels to chatter, the trees being left far behind them and only the bare rocks remaining.
But the waves dashed foaming up among the bare rocks at her feet, mingling their cold spray with her tears, and gave no answer to her prayer.
In many areas, there are submerged creek beds, apparently the result of historic rise in sea levels (yep, it was occurring 10,000 years ago, too) that are fish highways, particularly where they make bends or meet side creeks, or expose bare rock or caves.
Up the hill from Methelin Bay's sandy beach, I climb down to water through invasive casuarina and Mexican pepper followed by bare rock surfaces infinitely water shaped into sharp little limestone mountain ranges the size of razors.
The grains in desert sand dunes have been deposited mainly by wind action and originate in other parts of the desert where bare rock surfaces are constantly being weathered by exposure to sun, wind and water.
As September spilled into October, they made their way across a flat, pirion-dotted landscape until, without warning, the ground gave way and they gazed into one of the defining features of the New World: the greatest testament on Earth to the power of water, the beauty of bare rock, and the fearsome magnificence of deep time.
The celebrated fells have been thoroughly sheep-wrecked: the forests that once covered them have been reduced by the white plague to bare rock and bowling green.
He said the most likely problems encountered off the coast of Anglesey would be 10metre high sand waves and bare rock.