bare

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bare

Descriptive of a piece of material which is smaller than the specified dimensions; scant.
References in classic literature ?
The service on New Year's Eve is the only one in the whole year that in the least impresses me in our little church, and then the very bareness and ugliness of the place and the ceremonial produce an effect that a snug service in a well-lit church never would.
The room, with its combination of luxury and bareness, its silk dressing-gowns and crimson slippers, its shabby carpet and bare walls, had a powerful air of Katharine herself; she stood in the middle of the room and enjoyed the sensation; and then, with a desire to finger what her cousin was in the habit of fingering, Cassandra began to take down the books which stood in a row upon the shelf above the bed.
You, who are one of our most pious and faithful parishioners, must have keenly felt the bareness of the high altar.
More than ever I feel true nostalgia for the real meaning of things, for the pureness of the people, for the bareness of my landscape, and for my friends," he wrote then.
What if hopefulness and bareness was not necessarily opposite conditions of life but could emerge as one and the same?
The white foot, or root, of the Lily is at once a realistic detail and a mythic suggestion, at once chaste in its color and yet sensual, even sexual, in its bareness, its tactility, its rootedness.
We get mentally programming that a rich and provocative look does not require nakedness, and bareness could likewise bring humble and formal.
Deforestation as a result of firewood collection, overgrazing, brick molding, invasive species (lantana camara), poor agricultural practices and veldt fires incidences are contributing to the bareness of land cover which was estimated at 70 percent by the baseline survey.
The image of the piazza finds its logical fulfillment in the nudity of the figures: they carry this bareness of their own bodies with them into the piazza, clamorously discarding the commands of decency [ordine di pudore], the civil discipline of dress-codes.
Despite the bareness, it's a very handsomely-staged production, with sumptuous and detailed 18th-century costumes, and some impressive wigs.
The bareness of the spaces blurs the line between indoors and outdoors, a minimalistic infrastructure which, paired with the absence of modern digital comforts like WiFi and TVs in the rooms, is meant to unburden guests for the wellness programing.