barge

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barge,

large boat, generally flat-bottomed, used for transporting goods. Most barges on inland waterways are towed, but some river barges are self-propelled. There are also sailing barges. On the Great Lakes and in the American coastal trade, huge steel barges are used for transporting bulk cargoes such as coal. Large flat-bottomed barges called lighters are used for transporting cargo to or from a vessel that cannot be berthed at a pier or dock; LASH (for lighter-aboard ship) vessels are equipped to receive and unload lighters on board and thus reduce the time spent in port. Barge towing, done in the past by men or by horses or mules, is now accomplished mostly by steam or motor tugboat or by other, self-propelled barges. In use since the dawn of history, barges were common on the Nile in ancient Egypt. Some were highly decorated and used for carrying royalty; use of such state barges persisted in Europe until modern times.

barge

[bärj]
(naval architecture)
A large cargo-carrying craft which is towed or pushed by a tug on both seagoing and inland waters.

barge

1. a vessel, usually flat-bottomed and with or without its own power, used for transporting freight, esp on canals
2. a vessel, often decorated, used in pageants, for state occasions, etc.
3. Austral informal a heavy or cumbersome surfboard
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the PFS, barging costs have been estimated to include the loading of river barges at Banda, river travel, transfer costs at Escravos, ocean travel to the floating transhipment facility, subsequent loading of OGV's and owner operating costs.
April through October is the perfect time for a barging holiday.
Site information required for each location and each leg of the barging operation;
The acquisition offers a unique opportunity for CSX to extend its existing barging services and provide customers a broader array of service options," said John W.
While most of the Ohio River has returned to more normal conditions, the lower Mississippi River is currently experiencing the worst operating conditions in many years with productivity and the cost of barging operations being severely impacted.
With changing water levels, ice, a short barging season-to try to get it all done in one short four-month period, that's a big challenge.