barometric pressure


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barometric pressure

[bar·ə′met·rik ′presh·ər]

atmospheric pressure, barometric pressure

The pressure exerted by the earth’s atmosphere; under standard conditions equal to 14.7 lb per sq in. (1.01 × 106 pascals) equivalent to the pressure exerted by a column of mercury 29.9 in. (76.0 cm) high.

barometric pressure

The local atmospheric pressure. It is normally measured by a barometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of the barometric pressure on sea level variability was removed by using the hydrostatic equation following the methodology of Gill (1982), and Salas-Monreal & Valle-Levinson (2008):
This belief suggests that the actual air pressure has little to do with the fish's desire to feed, but more accurately it seems likely that the weather conditions created by changes in barometric pressure, such as clouds, rain and wind, have more effect on fishing than the barometric pressure alone.
If you are using the normal handheld ballistic computer, you have to enter the temperature and barometric pressure for every changing condition.
Crappies may be quite susceptible to rapid changes in barometric pressure, but that might not be the only reason we can't always find them where they're "supposed to be.
I don't think the barometric pressure has to be rising or that it has to be dropping--I think it's just a rapid change that deer notice.
We know deer can smell better than dogs, but I suspect that when the barometric pressure drops, deer can't smell as well either.
The Kestrel 4000 NV measures every major environmental condition: barometric pressure, altitude, density altitude, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind chill, dewpoint, wet bulb temperature and heat stress.
Lower barometric pressure within two or three days of the hospital visit also increased the risk of non-migraine headaches.
2 : a region of high barometric pressure <A strong high brought clear skies.
The WatchDog[R] Sprayer Station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, and apparent wind speed and direction.
During this multi-phase, yearlong scientific study, ARTEL visited locations with extreme ranges of commonly encountered laboratory conditions, such as high and low temperatures, varying humidity and barometric pressure.
The Strykers use digital targeting to measure wind factors, the cant of the vehicle and barometric pressure.