baryonic matter


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Related to baryonic matter: dark matter, Baryons

baryonic matter

(ba-ree-on -ik) Normal matter containing baryons, i.e. protons and neutrons. It is thought that a large proportion of dark matter could be composed of nonbaryons, such as WIMPS.
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Since the quantum mass is this large it is pointless to attempt to distinguish between dark and baryonic matter.
If her calculation is correct, it would account for the two-thirds of galaxies' baryonic matter that astronomers have been looking for, Werk said.
It allows the rotation curves of galaxies to be described by only the observed baryonic matter of the galaxy.
Scientists have been able to estimate how much ``ordinary'' or baryonic matter - the stuff we can see and feel - should have been created out of the Big Bang that gave birth to the universe.
For example, astrophysicists and cosmologists today are asking questions about what the universe is actually made of-because it certainly isn't made up of the normal stuff all around us, which we call baryonic matter.
In the early universe, baryonic matter coupled with thermal radiation, creating a state of acoustic oscillation.
Because the ratio of normal matter to dark matter is now very well known, for example from measuring the cosmic microwave background, we have a pretty good idea of how much baryonic matter should be in the halo.
This expansion of space is because the space itself is a dynamical system, and the (small) amount of actual baryonic matter merely slightly slows that expansion, as the matter dissipates space.
Their topics include tests of general relativity, finite versus infinite universe in space and time, dark energy discovered, baryonic matter, and cosmological inflation.
McGaugh and his colleagues posed the question of whether the "universal" ratio of baryonic matter to dark matter holds on the scales of individual structures like galaxies.
The baryonic matter, which produces the light and other radiations we observe, must go to the center of each galaxy, leaving outside of itself a sizable halo composed almost entirely of the dark matter.