base


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Related to base: Base camp, second base

base:

see acids and basesacids and bases,
two related classes of chemicals; the members of each class have a number of common properties when dissolved in a solvent, usually water. Properties
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.

Base

The lowest and most visible part of a building, often treated with distinctive materials, such as rustication; also pertains to the lowest part of a column or pier that rests on a pedestal, plinth or stylobate.

Base

 

in electrical and radio engineering, a component of an electron or ion device, such as an incandescent lamp, a fluorescent lamp, or an electron tube. The base is used to install the device in, for example, a socket and to provide the connection between the elements within the device, such as the filaments or the electrodes, and the external electric circuit.

base

[bās]
(chemistry)
Any chemical species, ionic or molecular, capable of accepting or receiving a proton (hydrogen ion) from another substance; the other substance acts as an acid in giving of the proton. Also known as Brønsted base.
(chemical engineering)
The primary substance in solution in crude oil, and remaining after distillation.
(computer science)
(electronics)
The region that lies between an emitter and a collector of a transistor and into which minority carriers are injected.
The part of an electron tube that has the pins, leads, or other terminals to which external connections are made either directly or through a socket.
The plastic, ceramic, or other insulating board that supports a printed wiring pattern.
(engineering)
Foundation or part upon which an object or instrument rests.
(genetics)
(graphic arts)
A transparent plastic film on which a photographic emulsion is applied.
(lapidary)
(mathematics)
A side or face upon which the altitude of a geometric configuration is thought of as being constructed.
For a logarithm, the number of which the logarithm is the exponent.
For a number system, the number whose powers determine place value.
For a topological space, a collection of sets, unions of which form all the open sets of the space.
(ordnance)
Station or installation from which military forces operate and from which supplies are obtained.

base

bases, 3
1. The lowest (and often widest) visible part of a building, often distinctively treated. A base is distinguished from a foundation or footing in being visible rather than buried.
2. A low, thickened section of a wall; a wall base. Also see socle.
3. Lower part of a column or pier, wider than the shaft, and resting on a plinth, pedestal, podium, or stylobate. Also see Asiatic base, Attic base.
4. A baseboard; skirting.
5. A preparation for a finished surface, as for flooring, stucco, paint, etc.; a surface to which the base coat of plaster is applied. Also see backing, ground.
6. In paint, either the medium or the main chemical ingredient.
7. In asphaltic or portland cement concrete paving, the prepared bottom course of crushed stone or gravel upon which subsequent courses are laid; serves to distribute localized wheel loads over a larger subbase and hence to improve load-bearing capacity.
8. The lowest point of any vertical pipe.

base

base
base
i. A location where aircraft with all facilities are based. Refers to an air force base, naval air station, and fixed base operator.
ii. In air traffic control phraseology and when transmitted on the radio, it means turning onto the base leg of the circuit pattern. The base leg, as it is known, is flown at right angles to the runway, just before turning to the final direction for landing.
iii. In photogrammetry, the distance at the scale of the stereoscopic model between adjacent perspective centers as reconstructed in the plotting instrument. Also called an air base.
iv. In military radio telephony usage, it means the airfield from which the mission was launched, as in “return to base.”
v. The same as base course.

base

1
1. a chemical compound that combines with an acid to form a salt and water. A solution of a base in water turns litmus paper blue, produces hydroxyl ions, and has a pH greater than 7. Bases are metal oxides or hydroxides or amines
2. Biochem. any of the nitrogen-containing constituents of nucleic acids: adenine, thymine (in DNA), uracil (in RNA), guanine, or cytosine
3. the inorganic material on which the dye is absorbed in lake pigments; carrier
4. Biology
a. the part of an organ nearest to its point of attachment
b. the point of attachment of an organ or part
5. Architect
a. the lowest division of a building or structure
b. the lower part of a column or pier
6. the lower side or face of a geometric construction
7. Maths
a. the number of distinct single-digit numbers in a counting system, and so the number represented as 10 in a place-value system
b. (of a logarithm or exponential) the number whose powers are expressed
c. (of a mathematical structure) a substructure from which the given system can be generated
d. the initial instance from which a generalization is proven by mathematical induction
8. Logic Maths the initial element of a recursive definition, that defines the first element of the infinite sequence generated thereby
9. Electronics the region in a transistor between the emitter and collector
10. Photog the glass, paper, or cellulose-ester film that supports the sensitized emulsion with which it is coated
11. a starting or finishing point in any of various games
12. Baseball any of the four corners of the diamond, which runners have to reach in order to score

base

2
1. English history
a. (of land tenure) held by villein or other ignoble service
b. holding land by villein or other ignoble service
2. Music an obsolete spelling of bass

base

(mathematics)

base

(1) A starting or reference point.

(2) In a bipolar transistor, the elements that act as a switch. In NMOS and PMOS transistors, which make up CMOS circuits, the base is called the "gate." See transistor.

(3) A multiplier in a numbering system. In a decimal system, each digit position is worth 10x the position to its right. In binary, each digit position is worth 2x the position to its right.
References in classic literature ?
The frost and the tempests of unnumbered ages had battered and hacked at these cliffs, with a deathless energy, destroying them piecemeal; so all the region about their bases was a tumbled chaos of great fragments which had been split off and hurled to the ground.
The rock, already shaken by the explosion, tottered on its base.
At length we stood against the giant tree that we had chosen for our ascent, and then, as charge after charge hurled its weight upon us, we gave back again and again, until we had been forced half-way around the huge base of the colossal trunk.
Though I carefully scanned the cliff as I traversed its base, I saw no sign of any other entrance than that to which my guides had led me.
From my ledge to the base of the cliff is a matter of several thousand feet of dangerous climbing; yet I venture to say that the first ape from whose loins my line has descended never could have equaled the speed with which I literally dropped down the face of that rugged escarpment.
Thus, powerful fireworks, taking their starting-point from the base and bursting outside, could, by producing a recoil, check to a certain degree the projectile's speed.
In ordinary combs it has appeared to me that the bees do not always succeed in working at exactly the same rate from the opposite sides; for I have noticed half-completed rhombs at the base of a just-commenced cell, which were slightly concave on one side, where I suppose that the bees had excavated too quickly, and convex on the opposed side, where the bees had worked less quickly.
If you have not sense sufficient to restrain such monstrous inclinations, I thought the pride of our family would have prevented you from giving the least encouragement to so base an affection; much less did I imagine you would ever have had the assurance to own it to my face.
Shy distrust is regarded by it as base, and every one who wanteth oaths instead of looks and hands: also all over-distrustful wisdom,--for such is the mode of cowardly souls.
It's worse than cruel--it's base, if you want to know
The emphasis was helped by the speaker's square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall.
For as mountain after mountain, and island after island, slowly sank beneath the water, fresh bases would be successively afforded for the growth of the corals.