base

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base:

see acids and basesacids and bases,
two related classes of chemicals; the members of each class have a number of common properties when dissolved in a solvent, usually water. Properties
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.

Base

The lowest and most visible part of a building, often treated with distinctive materials, such as rustication; also pertains to the lowest part of a column or pier that rests on a pedestal, plinth or stylobate.

Base

 

in electrical and radio engineering, a component of an electron or ion device, such as an incandescent lamp, a fluorescent lamp, or an electron tube. The base is used to install the device in, for example, a socket and to provide the connection between the elements within the device, such as the filaments or the electrodes, and the external electric circuit.

base

[bās]
(chemistry)
Any chemical species, ionic or molecular, capable of accepting or receiving a proton (hydrogen ion) from another substance; the other substance acts as an acid in giving of the proton. Also known as Brønsted base.
(chemical engineering)
The primary substance in solution in crude oil, and remaining after distillation.
(computer science)
(electronics)
The region that lies between an emitter and a collector of a transistor and into which minority carriers are injected.
The part of an electron tube that has the pins, leads, or other terminals to which external connections are made either directly or through a socket.
The plastic, ceramic, or other insulating board that supports a printed wiring pattern.
(engineering)
Foundation or part upon which an object or instrument rests.
(genetics)
(graphic arts)
A transparent plastic film on which a photographic emulsion is applied.
(lapidary)
(mathematics)
A side or face upon which the altitude of a geometric configuration is thought of as being constructed.
For a logarithm, the number of which the logarithm is the exponent.
For a number system, the number whose powers determine place value.
For a topological space, a collection of sets, unions of which form all the open sets of the space.
(ordnance)
Station or installation from which military forces operate and from which supplies are obtained.

base

bases, 3
1. The lowest (and often widest) visible part of a building, often distinctively treated. A base is distinguished from a foundation or footing in being visible rather than buried.
2. A low, thickened section of a wall; a wall base. Also see socle.
3. Lower part of a column or pier, wider than the shaft, and resting on a plinth, pedestal, podium, or stylobate. Also see Asiatic base, Attic base.
4. A baseboard; skirting.
5. A preparation for a finished surface, as for flooring, stucco, paint, etc.; a surface to which the base coat of plaster is applied. Also see backing, ground.
6. In paint, either the medium or the main chemical ingredient.
7. In asphaltic or portland cement concrete paving, the prepared bottom course of crushed stone or gravel upon which subsequent courses are laid; serves to distribute localized wheel loads over a larger subbase and hence to improve load-bearing capacity.
8. The lowest point of any vertical pipe.

base

base
base
i. A location where aircraft with all facilities are based. Refers to an air force base, naval air station, and fixed base operator.
ii. In air traffic control phraseology and when transmitted on the radio, it means turning onto the base leg of the circuit pattern. The base leg, as it is known, is flown at right angles to the runway, just before turning to the final direction for landing.
iii. In photogrammetry, the distance at the scale of the stereoscopic model between adjacent perspective centers as reconstructed in the plotting instrument. Also called an air base.
iv. In military radio telephony usage, it means the airfield from which the mission was launched, as in “return to base.”
v. The same as base course.

base

1
1. a chemical compound that combines with an acid to form a salt and water. A solution of a base in water turns litmus paper blue, produces hydroxyl ions, and has a pH greater than 7. Bases are metal oxides or hydroxides or amines
2. Biochem. any of the nitrogen-containing constituents of nucleic acids: adenine, thymine (in DNA), uracil (in RNA), guanine, or cytosine
3. the inorganic material on which the dye is absorbed in lake pigments; carrier
4. Biology
a. the part of an organ nearest to its point of attachment
b. the point of attachment of an organ or part
5. Architect
a. the lowest division of a building or structure
b. the lower part of a column or pier
6. the lower side or face of a geometric construction
7. Maths
a. the number of distinct single-digit numbers in a counting system, and so the number represented as 10 in a place-value system
b. (of a logarithm or exponential) the number whose powers are expressed
c. (of a mathematical structure) a substructure from which the given system can be generated
d. the initial instance from which a generalization is proven by mathematical induction
8. Logic Maths the initial element of a recursive definition, that defines the first element of the infinite sequence generated thereby
9. Electronics the region in a transistor between the emitter and collector
10. Photog the glass, paper, or cellulose-ester film that supports the sensitized emulsion with which it is coated
11. a starting or finishing point in any of various games
12. Baseball any of the four corners of the diamond, which runners have to reach in order to score

base

2
1. English history
a. (of land tenure) held by villein or other ignoble service
b. holding land by villein or other ignoble service
2. Music an obsolete spelling of bass

base

(mathematics)

base

(1) A starting or reference point.

(2) In a bipolar transistor, the elements that act as a switch. In NMOS and PMOS transistors, which make up CMOS circuits, the base is called the "gate." See transistor.

(3) A multiplier in a numbering system. In a decimal system, each digit position is worth 10x the position to its right. In binary, each digit position is worth 2x the position to its right.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is common in both is that sentiments of strife, injustice, and baseness should be erased from the ideal society (401c5-d3; cp.
my sweet mistress Weeps when she sees me work, and says such baseness Had never like executor.
Amelia got down the stairs first and pronto started bellowing obscenities about the baseness of dogs.
Still, there was a pathos about a country which, established by the American Colonisation Society (ACS) in 1827 as a colony for freed blacks, could come to regard the indigenous Africans as a people fit only for subservience, in the process degrading itself so completely that a bunch of European powers, former slave traders through and through, could lecture convincingly about the baseness of the Liberian enterprise.
But Berne, accused by Libya of "political baseness," has not confirmed that such a list exists, saying that it is pursuing a "restrictive visa policy" for Libyans put in place in September 2009, given that Tripoli is still detaining two Swiss citizens.
But my faith in the baseness of humanity was restored in a brief journey from the city centre one recent evening rush-hour.
He is considered a naturalist writer in the school of Emile Zola mainly by the style of the first two novels, in which he describes human behavior, without hiding its baseness or cruelties, with the supposedly impartial eye of a scientific observer.
Neither can you understand the difference between dignity and baseness of gesture unless you have "your own dignity of character" (RA, Works xxii, 233).
What could have happened over the intervening years since Kertess first described the early Koons as "extravagant convections [that] wallow in a sticky-fingered baseness and sentimentality endemic to disenfranchised craft and franchised pulp but seldom seen in high art since the Pre-Raphaelites and Bouguereau"?
In Ivo van Hove's reimagined Misanthrope at NYTW in 2007, Camp plunged his Alceste to new levels of shock and baseness, smearing himself with chocolate sauce and rolling around in trash brought in from the actual East Village street.
Relationships based on worldly values can degenerate into baseness, as often happens in marriage.