bast fiber


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

bast fiber

[′bast ‚fī·bər]
(botany)
Any fiber stripped from the inner bark of plants, such as flax, hemp, jute, and ramie; used in textile and paper manufacturing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary bast fibers are the most valuable product of the stems, and are 3-55 pm long (van der Werf, 1994); they are amalgamated in fiber bundles which can be 1-5 m long (Fig.
The basic materials of wood shavings, kenaf bast fibers (hereafter "kenaf"), and bicomponent fibers are shown in Figure 1.
Atchison explained that chemical pulping of the shorter core fiber is thwarted by the fact that "it just won't drain on a paper machine," and the great length of the bast fiber can interfere with its mechanical pulping.
Kenaf yields two raw materials and the outer bast fibers have many textile applications, both woven and nonwoven," says Galvin.
Kenaf bast fiber bundles (KBFBs) have the potential to replace petroleum-based or glass fibers for fiber-reinforced composite applications due to their low density, high specific strength and stiffness, low cost, reduced wear on the processing equipment, renewability, and biodegradability.
Dowling has improved total stalk fiber yield, higher bast fiber percentage, and lower susceptibility to lodging compared with other cordate-shaped leaf cultivars.
CPI is partial to the shive product: "While bast fiber provides a bit better tensile strength, shive has lower density," says CPI application design engineer Charles Weber.
In China, the textile industry covers cotton and chemical fiber spinning, printing & dyeing and finishing, wool spinning, printing & dyeing and finishing, bast fiber spinning, silk spinning and finishing, made up textile articles manufacture, knitted fabrics and products manufacture.
The effect of alkalization and fiber alignment on the mechanical and thermal properties of kenaf and hemp bast fiber composite: Part 1- polyester resin matrix.
The AFT platform includes Activatl bast fiber products and feedstocks from kenaf, flax and/or jute, which are suited to all nonwoven manufacturing processes.
This process is usually microbial in nature, to loose and separate the bast fiber bundles from the non-fiber fractions of the flax stem (11).