bathtub curve


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bathtub curve

[′bath‚təb ‚kərv]
(industrial engineering)
An equipment failure-rate curve with an initial sharply declining failure rate, followed by a prolonged constant-average failure rate, after which the failure rate again increases sharply.

bathtub curve

Common term for the curve (resembling an end-to-end section of one of those claw-footed antique bathtubs) that describes the expected failure rate of electronics with time: initially high, dropping to near 0 for most of the system's lifetime, then rising again as it "tires out". See also burn-in period, infant mortality.
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Burn-in testing (BIT) is supposed to detect and eliminate such "freaks," so that the final bathtub curve of a product that underwent BIT does not contain the infant mortality portion.
The failure rate is historically modelled (Crowe & Feinberg, 2001; Moubray, 1997; Andrews & Moss, 1993) using the traditional bathtub curve shown in Figure 1.
Wg Cdr Bromehead, in evidence, said: "The bathtub curve is a general engineering principle that is when something gets old, it is more likely to break.
With that in mind, the observed failure rate of the test population can be expressed on the Bathtub Curve as the result of the composition of three prominent failure types: early life failure, constant (random) failure and wear-out failure.
This speed is applied in a Quick-View display which simultaneously shows the Eye Diagram, Spectrum and NQ-Scale Jitter Decomposition, TIE, jitter histogram and Bathtub curve.
These innovations, as well as the heralded four simultaneous views of eye diagram, time interval error, bathtub curve and jitter histogram, come standard in the new SDA 7 Zi analyzers.
0 Gb/s, and offers advanced capabilities including jitter injection, sensitivity control, PRBS generation and Bathtub curve generation.
These tools, such as Deterministic Jitter (DJ) histogram and Bathtub curve, deliver graphical information aimed at analyzing the discrete types of jitter, such as data dependent jitter, random jitter and periodic jitter.
In addition to quantifying jitter, and noise and eye height/width, the software allows users to understand the root causes of jitter by displaying a rich set of visualizations including histograms, tracks, spectra, and bathtub curves.
The channel analysis output includes 2D and 3D eye diagrams, along with bathtub curves, for accurate bit error rate prediction.
Statistical contours show the eye opening in terms of BER, similar to the bathtub curves that indicate eye width variance with BER.