Batten

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batten

1. a narrow flat length of wood or plastic inserted in pockets of a sail to give it proper shape
2. a lath used for holding a tarpaulin along the side of a raised hatch on a ship
3. Theatre
a. a row of lights
b. the strip or bar supporting them
4. NZ an upright part of a fence made of wood or other material, designed to keep wires at equal distances apart

Batten

Jean. 1909--82, New Zealand aviator: the first woman to fly single-handed from Australia to Britain (1935)

Batten

A narrow strip of wood that is applied over a joint between parallel boards in the same plane. In roofing, the standing seam of a metal roof gives the same appearance of a batten,

Batten

 

(Russian tes), a thin board obtained by sawing softwood logs lengthwise. Battens are 4–6.4 m long, 19–25 mm thick, and usually 100–110 mm wide. They are used in shipbuilding and railroad car construction to form paneling—either flush or with spaces between the planks—and to cover roofs and panel walls. Originally, boards obtained from the roughhewing of logs (obtesyvanie), which were usually first split in half, were designated by the term tes.

batten

[′bat·ən]
(aerospace engineering)
Metal, wood, or plastic panels laced to the envelope of a blimp in the nose cone to add rigidity to the nose and provide a good point of attachment for mooring.
(building construction)
A sawed timber strip of specific dimension-usually 7 inches (18 centimeters) broad, less than 4 inches (10 centimeters) thick, and more than 6 feet (1.8 meters) long-used for outside walls of houses, flooring, and such.
A strip of wood nailed across a door or other structure made of parallel boards to strengthen it and prevent warping.

batten

1. A narrow strip of wood applied to cover a joint along the edges of two parallel boards in the same plane.
2. A strip of wood fastened across two or more parallel boards to hold them together; also called a cross batten
3. A flat strip of wood attached to a wall as a base for lathing, plastering, etc.; also called a furring strip.
4. In roofing, a wood strip applied over boards or roof structural members; used as a base for the attachment of slate, wood, or clay-tile shingles.
5.See board and batten
6. A board usually 2 in. (5 cm) to 4 in. (10 cm) thick and usually used as a lathing support or in flooring.
7. A steel strip used to secure metal flooring on a fire escape.
8. On a theater stage, a strip of wood to frame, stiffen, or reinforce a flat, or to fasten several flats together.
9. On a theater stage, length of hollow metal of round, square, or rectangular cross section used in connection with stage rigging to hang scenery or lighting equipment, such as a pipe batten or lighting batten.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gail said Jessica's surgery could have "enormous" significance for the Battens community.
Insert wall plugs and screw the battens firmly to the wall above and below your pipes.
GOING PLACES: 500-year-old Battens Farm has moved from Redditch to Ipsley
This should only be done over one of the battens, and remember to stagger the joints.
Use 22mm x 50mm treated timber battens for plastered walls (with fixings 20mm longer than the thickness of the plaster and battens combined) and 38mm x 50mm treated timber battens for block and brickwork (with fixings a minimum of 60mm long).
Battens are joined using simple applied-bolt connections, stiffened with double-sided nailplates (there are over 600 joints).
When Batten, the now-retired chairman of Landmark Communications, announced his company's plan for a 24-hour weather network in 1981, the media and business communities responded with a collective snicker.
Guin Batten added: "It feels like we have made history.
The next step is to cut the 1 1/2" wide by 3/4" deep rabbets on the ends of the battens.
Symbolic carvings on the miniature battens in Tomb 7 suggest that they were part of a bundle of objects often buried with high-ranking male priests, Flannery and Marcus contend.
Eventually, children with Battens can become blind, bedridden and demented.