battery


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battery,

in criminal and tort law, the unpermitted touching of any part of the person of another, or of anything worn, carried by, or intimately associated at that moment (as a chair being sat on) with another. Contact must be intended by the aggressor, must be reasonably considered offensive, and must be without consent by the one affected. (Consent is assumed for the ordinary and customary contacts of everyday life.) Gross negligence may provide the intent necessary to constitute a battery. Actual physical injuries need not be sustained by the victim; thus a doctor who performs an operation without consent can be sued for battery, even though the patient is benefited by the operation. The term "assault and battery" refers to a crime, the unlawful touching of another as the consummation of an assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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.

Battery

 

(military), the basic artillery firing subunit. Batteries can be separate (regimental battery, coast artillery battery) or can be part of artillery battalions (regiments). The concept “battery” originally signified a large tactical unit containing a specific number of guns (for example, the French Army’s 100–gun battery at the Battle of Wagram in 1809). In Russia an organic firing unit was introduced in 1833 instead of a company. In modern armies a battery contains from two to three firing platoons, a headquarters platoon (squad), and from two to six guns (infantry mortars) or from four to six mounts. In combat all components of the battery are generally utilized. Batteries of regimental, antitank, and low caliber antiaircraft artillery can also be employed in platoons or by the piece. Subunits which undertake topographic, sound-ranging, and optical reconnaisance are also called batteries. There are also headquarters batteries, maintenance batteries, training batteries, and so on.

battery

[′bad·ə·rē]
(chemical engineering)
A series of distillation columns or other processing equipment operated as a single unit.
(electricity)
A direct-current voltage source made up of one or more units that convert chemical, thermal, nuclear, or solar energy into electrical energy.
(ordnance)
A group of guns or other weapons, such as mortars, machine guns, artillery pieces, or of searchlights, set up under one tactical commander in a certain area.

battery

1. A combination of two or more electric cells capable of storing and supplying direct current by electrochemical means.
2. Any group of two or more similar adjacent plumbing fixtures which discharge into a common horizontal waste or soil branch.

battery

1. 
a. two or more primary cells connected together, usually in series, to provide a source of electric current
b. short for dry battery
2. another name for accumulator
3. Criminal law unlawful beating or wounding of a person or mere touching in a hostile or offensive manner
4. Chiefly Brit
a. a large group of cages for intensive rearing of poultry
b. (as modifier): battery hens
5. Psychol a series of tests
6. Chess two men of the same colour placed so that one can unmask an attack by the other by moving
7. the percussion section in an orchestra
8. Baseball the pitcher and the catcher considered together

battery

A storage device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. Used by the billions each year from tiny hearing aid batteries to units that some day may be 40 feet long (see illustration below), the battery is constructed of positive and negative metal electrodes. When the two electrodes are connected together by a circuit on the outside, a chemical reaction is created inside, and electrons flow from the negative electrode through an electrolyte to the positive electrode creating a voltage difference. The electrolyte material prevents the electrons from flowing until the circuit is completed on the outside.

The First Battery
Alessandro Volta invented the first battery in 1800 to sustain an electric current. His "voltaic pile" was a stack of cells, each containing a brine-soaked cloth sandwiched between zinc and copper discs. He got the idea from Luigi Galvani, who in the late 1700s generated current from two dissimilar metals joined together by a frog's muscle. Over time, there has been progress! See batteries.


The Liquid Metal Battery
This battery technology uses molten metals and was invented for the U.S. electrical grid, but all batteries work the same. When the electrodes are connected to a load on the outside (light bulb, electronic circuit, electrical grid, etc.), electrons flow from the negative electrode to the positive electrode through the electrolyte. See liquid metal battery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Altairnano solved this problem by using an innovative approach to rechargeable battery chemistry by replacing graphite with a patented nano-titanate material as the negative electrode in its NanoSafe batteries.
If your M1A2 SEP tank has the additional six batteries in the left rear sponson (the "6-Pack" battery mod), then all 12 batteries on the tank must be the same type.
In order to decrease the amount of waste to the least possible after the product is purchased, SANYO has achieved with this product, an eco-friendly product design, right from the battery itself to its packaging.
Paul says the same concerns with storing and transporting any auto battery also apply to nickel-metal hydrides.
If the battery or case is cracked or leaking, be especially careful to choose a leak-proof container.
The Big Green Box program offers consumers, companies and government agencies the opportunity to recycle any battery (including "alkalines) or portable electronic device without having to drive to a recycling center.
Dynamic power requirements, high discharge rates, extreme operating temperatures and aggressive charging methods are causing severe capacity losses in battery systems not properly designed for the application.
One battery component of concern to the industry is cobalt, typically obtained as a by-product of manufacturing nickel.
In contrast, he adds, the sulfur-aluminum cell runs at room temperature, storing seven times as much charge per pound as a lead-acid battery.
Use a wire brush, NSN 7290-00-291-5815, to clean as much corrosion, cracked paint and dirt as you can from the battery hold-downs.
Solar chargers for virtually any type of battery are available through the California-based Real Goods Trading Company for between $14 and $30.