bedding plane


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bedding plane

[′bed·iŋ ‚plān]
(geology)
Any of the division planes which separate the individual strata or beds in sedimentary or stratified rock.

bedding plane

The surface at which two beds, layers, or strata join in stratified rocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
The average values are: parallel to the bedding plane ([s.
In order to formulate the thermal conductivity problem around the BHE inserted into the ground so that its surface is at angle [THETA] to the bedding plane, one needs to find the conductivity tensor in the chosen coordinate system.
The experimental breaks were either perpendicular to the bedding plane, as a result of shock, or occurred along banded flaws running parallel to the bedding plane, resulting in split slabs and shatter.
Orientation parallel to the bedding plane suggests that the coprolites are a primary depositional feature.
A sample collected from quarry ledge 9, about 8 m above the base of the Morgan Hill Bed, contained multiple shrinkage crack polygons along an algal mat covered bedding plane.
The Hampton Formation megaripples (HFM) are exposed on the upper surface bedding plane of a 35 cm thick coarse-grained sandstone.
TABLE 1 Results from the Brassfield formation sbowing the core number as located in Figure 6, depth of the sample in meters, the magnetic declination/inclination of the high temperature component prior to rotation about the sample bedding plane, and magnetic declination inclination after rotation about the sample bedding plane.
elegans shoal has preserved in a lens-like fish bed with rare ostracods and a few osteostracans (Tremataspis and Dartmuthia) occurring on the same bedding plane, while most of osteostracan and anaspid exoskeletons were buried under more agitated water conditions.
Grey and brown sandstone, eroded in lines that follow ancient bedding planes.
This new discovery comes from the very bottom of the fossil-bearing rocks, making it one of the oldest bedding planes to preserve 'animal' fossils in the whole of the geological record.
Apparently the original clayey cementation between bedding planes is very weak and easy to be broken with small changes in thermal stress.
Most of the material occurs within the light to dark brown organic-rich, microlaminated, partly dolomitized limestones, which form 1-20 mm thick laminae on the bedding planes of micritic limestone layers.