behavior therapy

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behavior therapy

or

behavior modification,

in psychology, treatment of human behavioral disorders through the reinforcement of acceptable behavior and suppression of undesirable behavior. The technique had its roots in the work of Ivan PavlovPavlov, Ivan Petrovich
, 1849–1936, Russian physiologist and experimental psychologist. He was professor at the military medical academy and director of the physiology department at the Institute for Experimental Medicine, St. Petersburg, from 1890.
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, a Russian physiologist who observed that animals could be taught to respond to stimuli that might otherwise have no effect on them. B. F. SkinnerSkinner, Burrhus Frederic,
1904–90, American psychologist, b. Susquehanna, Pa. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1931, and remained there as an instructor until 1936, when he moved to the Univ. of Minnesota (1937–45) and to Indiana Univ.
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 developed the technique in the United States, using positive or negative reinforcers to encourage desirable behavior and punishments to discourage undesirable behavior. Behavior therapists believe that, in many cases, behaviors can be learned or unlearned through basic conditioning techniques; unlike traditional psychoanalysis, the method has little regard for the unconscious processes underlying personality disorders. Behavior therapy uses such techniques as aversive conditioning, where unwanted habits are paired with unpleasant stimuli, and systematic desensitization, where a stimulus that causes anxiety is paired with a pleasant one.

behavior therapy

[bi′hāv·yər ‚ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A mode of therapy that focuses on altering observable and quantifiable behavior of an individual by means of systematic manipulation of environmental and behavioral variables that are thought to be functionally related to the individual's behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, as second generation behavior therapies became increasingly cognitive, a vast body of research on verbal conditioning drifted from active use by behavior therapists.
Behavior therapists adapt their treatment in response to the client's specific problems, creating and modifying treatment plans in response to their effectiveness, always guided by the principles of learning.
For behavior therapists and specialists, developmental psychopathology is an area of growing interest.
Cognitive Behavior Therapists will love to have this to use as a resource.
In fact, behavior therapists who work with children with emotional or behavioral problems often do not directly measure behavior to generate data for their clinical treatment (Spaulding, Bahl, & Hawkins, 1996).
Behavior therapists may develop interventions with contingency plans that involve nonsmokers to prevent resentment by this group, especially if rewards are involved.
In the United States, only behavior therapists have paid much attention to treating the disorder.
For teachers, counselors, behavior therapists, and caregivers, Ross, an educator who works with children with special needs and autism, and Roberts-Pacchione, a counselor who facilitates social skills groups and sessions with children, provide activities to help children learn social skills, make friends, and behave appropriately.
There is a long waiting list for everything,'' Ariam said, especially for speech and behavior therapists.
The anecdotes are organized and analyzed by professional behavior therapists.
AST also provides behavior therapists throughout Greater Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Orange Counties to serve individuals with autism from infancy through adulthood, and to provide comprehensive training and support for parents and families in their homes and communities.

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