belles-lettres

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belles-lettres

(bĕl-lĕ`trə) [from the French for literature, literally "fine letters"], literature that is appreciated for the beauty, artistry, and originality of its style and tone rather than for its ideas and informational content. Earlier the term was synonymous with literature, referring particularly to fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, and essays. However, belletristic literature has come to mean light, artificial writing and essays extolling the beauties of literature.

belles-lettres

literary works, esp essays and poetry, valued for their aesthetic rather than their informative or moral content
References in periodicals archive ?
Stefan, despite his brevity and careful adherence to local belletrist tradition, manages to communicate to his brother, with the help of metaphor and folkloric expression, the general state of life in the village.
6) The metaphysical weight of the conversational essay places it at the heart of a generic development almost unnoticed in English philosophy: the migration of philosophical discourse from the eighteenth-century "treatise," which had hitherto been chiefly its realm, into the more informal, more intimate writings of the belletrist.
Critics may judge the contest, explain, interpret, historicize, and other things (such as writing their spiritual autobiographies in an orgy of belletrist aesthetics), but it is the poets who marry each other's work forth, who carry each other's work into renewed greatness, and this happens through the kabuki dance of influence and through the love, bickering, devotion, and battle with the work that we have chosen (and been chosen by) in First World.
Ibn al-'Amid was preceded, however, by the perceptive belletrist (d.
Ibn 'Asakir reproduces for us an account from the belletrist al-Marzubani (d.
is the goal"--Benjamin unpacks Kratts's linguistic re-creations of earlier belletrists, so that lie WO could participate within the synoptic space of Bildung.
The second meaning refers to the 19th century Romanian authors, belletrists who were educated to express themselves in French or German (which were the international European languages of the epoch) and who wrote a part of their works in those languages, benefiting more or less from spreading their works in the cultural spaces already mentioned.
Like powerful eunuchs studied for the Qing by Bok-Rae Qim, these skilled performers traveled between the secluded women's world and the world of male belletrists --and were simultaneously admired and suspected by the inhabitants of both.
Considering the degree to which Jefferson structured and styled the Declaration to appeal to hearts as well as minds, Hayes seems on firm ground when he argues that 'the influence of poets, devotional writers, and other belletrists .
One project is a meticulous academic study bridging intellectual history and literary criticism by examining how Arab intellectuals and belletrists have dealt with sexuality.
Yet "the lords of the reviewing world before the Great War were the bookmen and belletrists Andrew Lang, Edmund Gosse and George Saintsbury" (155).
Furness received training in Germany, so did the great nineteenth-century belletrists like George Ticknor and Longfellow.