belt

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Related to belts: drive belts

belt,

girdle or band worn around the body, originally to confine loose garments. Later the girdle became a decorative accessory and was used to carry belongings. The Greeks and Romans wore ornamental cords and bands of many materials, including metal. The medieval belt displayed brilliant goldwork and gems; it carried the purse, dagger, sword, and other personal belongings of the wearer. Since then the belt has varied in style and importance. It has been symbolic of strength, of alertness, and of integrity. In folklore belts have often been accorded supernatural power.

belt

[belt]
(civil engineering)
In brickwork, a projecting row (or rows) of bricks, or an inserted row made of a different kind of brick.
(ecology)
Any altitudinal vegetation zone or band from the base to the summit of a mountain.
Any benthic vegetation zone or band from sea level to the ocean depths.
Any of the concentric vegetation zones around bodies of fresh water.
(hydrology)
A long area or strip of pack ice, with a width of 1 kilometer (0.6 mile) to more than 100 kilometers (60 miles).
(mechanical engineering)
A flexible band used to connect pulleys or to convey materials by transmitting motion and power.

belt

1. See seat belt
2. a band of flexible material between rotating shafts or pulleys to transfer motion or transmit goods
3. short for beltcourse (see cordon(sense 4))
4. below the belt Boxing below the waist, esp in the groin
References in classic literature ?
And in fact two more peasants began binding Dron, who took off his own belt and handed it to them, as if to aid them.
About his middle was strapped a belt, which carried a large-calibred automatic pistol and several spare clips, loaded and ready for quick work.
Two ropes were made fast to his leather belt and he bore the end of a third one in his hand to tie to the victim in case he found him.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
In the same belt was stuck one of those long, broad, sharp-pointed, and two-edged knives, with a buck's-horn handle, which were fabricated in the neighbourhood, and bore even at this early period the name of a Sheffield whittle.
With these words he handed the Herd-boy a belt, and walking on in front he led him to a fountain where hundreds of Giants and Giantesses were assembled preparing to hold a wedding.
At length an old, worm-eaten shutter was opened, or rather pushed ajar, but closed again as soon as the light from a miserable lamp which burned in the corner had shone upon the baldric, sword belt, and pistol pommels of D'Artagnan.
In the middle belt of the earth the Trade Winds reign supreme, undisputed, like monarchs of long-settled kingdoms, whose traditional power, checking all undue ambitions, is not so much an exercise of personal might as the working of long-established institutions.
As he finished his speech, in the dusk of a twilight, to his chosen associates, there was a sound of a rapidly unslung belt behind him.
She turned it from his skin as a mother whisks a fly from off her child when it is sleeping sweetly; she guided it to the part where the golden buckles of the belt that passed over his double cuirass were fastened, so the arrow struck the belt that went tightly round him.
He leans forward in his belt, eyes glued to the colloid, and one ear cocked toward the General Communicator.
Malo or Miquelon, - and everything was spread out on the top of the house, from his red knitted cap to the leather belt with the sheath-knife at the back.