benefit


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benefit

an allowance paid by the government as for sickness, unemployment, etc., to which a person is entitled under social security or the national insurance scheme
References in periodicals archive ?
While the best choice may often be to choose not to elect a reduced Social Security benefit in the first place, if a couple does so, then the analysis no longer has to do with whether delaying is better.
This contrasts with the most common pension plan for governmental employees, the California Public Employees' Retirement System, which is accounted for on a statewide basis with years of service with one employer accumulated with years of service from another employer if both use CalPERS for their defined benefit plan.
A good example of this type of plan is a single-employer welfare benefit plan (WBP) funded by a trust.
Flores received her Form SAA-1099, Social Security Benefit Statement, for 2002, the benefits reported totaled $20,675.
Only 22 percent of surveyed employees at organizations that poorly communicate the value of their rich benefit programs are satisfied with their benefit package.
Use of the federal definition creates uniformity between benefit plans and the federal income tax code under which these plans are governed.
As the debate surrounding same-sex marriage plays out across the country, companies in increasing numbers have quietly decided to offer the same insurance benefits to gay couples as they do to married couples.
If you do not put forward an attractive, user-friendly benefit plan, it is very difficult to recruit people.
Following approval by the governing Council at its fall 2003 meeting, the Institute has moved ahead with creating three new audit quality centers focusing on areas of critical importance to the public interest: public companies, employee benefit plans and governmental entities.
When Medicare was started in 1965, outpatient prescription drugs were not a common benefit in private insurance programs.
These measurements rely on customer responses in a telephone interview based on the benefit methodologies described below.
Reducing air pollution confers health benefits to the population as a whole, but researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health have found a way to predict benefits that may accrue to particular subpopulations, such as lower-income individuals and minorities, who suffer from higher rates of illnesses affected by air pollution [EHP 110:1253-1260].