benign

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Related to benignity: longanimity

benign

Pathol (of a tumour, etc.) not threatening to life or health; not malignant

benign

[bə′nīn]
(medicine)
Of no danger to life or health.
References in classic literature ?
He at first knit his brows; then smiled with more unctuous benignity than ever.
The truth was,--and it is Phoebe's only excuse,--that, although Judge Pyncheon's glowing benignity might not be absolutely unpleasant to the feminine beholder, with the width of a street, or even an ordinary-sized room, interposed between, yet it became quite too intense, when this dark, full-fed physiognomy (so roughly bearded, too, that no razor could ever make it smooth) sought to bring itself into actual contact with the object of its regards.
There was a dignity not of earth in its mien, and in its countenance a benignity such as never any thing human wore.
demanded Charmolue, with his imperturbable benignity.
She gave a nervous little laugh and looked from one to another with great benignity, as though she would like to say something but could not find the words in which to express it.
A large faith he might seem to have in what is called "natural optimism," the beauty and benignity of nature, if let alone, in her mechanical round of changes with man and beast and flower.
Expressing himself to this effect, Mr Squeers, who lost no opportunity of advertising gratuitously, placed his hands upon his knees, and looked at the pupils with as much benignity as he could possibly affect, while Nicholas, blushing with shame, handed round the cards as directed.
Cabinet ministers on both sides were alluded to by their Christian names with a sort of bored benignity.
As he thus moralised on my adventures, he looked upon me with so much humour and benignity that I could scarce contain my satisfaction.
On her deathbed the fortitude and benignity of this best of women did not desert her.
There was a wonderful air of benignity and patronage in his manner.
Even now, that she is walking up and down with a little triumphant flutter of her girlish heart at the sense that she is loved by the person of chief consequence in her small world, you may see in her hazel eyes an ever-present sunny benignity, in which the momentary harmless flashes of personal vanity are quite lost; and if she is happy in thinking of her lover, it is because the thought of him mingles readily with all the gentle affections and good-natured offices with which she fills her peaceful days.