Berry

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Berry

(bĕrē`), former province, central France. Bourges, the capital, and Châteauroux are the chief towns. Cattle are raised on the Champagne Berrichonne, a semiarid plateau that covers most of the region. The valleys of the Indre and the Cher rivers are rich farming areas. A part of Roman Aquitaine, Berry was made a county in the 8th cent., and was purchased (1101) by the French crown. In 1360 it was made a duchy. It was held as an appanage by various royal princes until 1601, when it reverted to the crown.

berry:

see fruitfruit,
matured ovary of the pistil of a flower, containing the seed. After the egg nucleus, or ovum, has been fertilized (see fertilization) and the embryo plantlet begins to form, the surrounding ovule (see pistil) develops into a seed and the ovary wall (pericarp) around the
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.

Berry

 

an indehiscent, usually many-seeded fruit. Unlike what occurs in an apple, all of the layers of a berry’s pericarp become succulent at the time of maturation. The seeds have a thick skin that protects the embryo from damage while passing through the digestive tract of animals. The berries of many plants (cranberry, red whortleberry, bilberry, grapes) are used in foods, and some (bilberry) are used medicinally. The berries of some plants (European bitter-sweet, honeysuckle) are poisonous. The fruits of the strawberry, raspberry, fig, and other plants are frequently incorrectly referred to as berries.

berry

[′ber·ē]
(botany)
A usually small, simple, fleshy or pulpy fruit, such as a strawberry, grape, tomato, or banana.

berry

1. any of various small edible fruits such as the blackberry and strawberry
2. Botany an indehiscent fruit with two or more seeds and a fleshy pericarp, such as the grape or gooseberry
3. any of various seeds or dried kernels, such as a coffee bean
4. the egg of a lobster, crayfish, or similar animal

Berry

1. Chuck, full name Charles Edward Berry. born 1926, US rock-and-roll guitarist, singer, and songwriter. His frequently covered songs include "Maybellene" (1955), "Roll over Beethoven" (1956), "Johnny B. Goode" (1958), "Memphis, Tennessee" (1959), and "Promised Land" (1964)
2. Jean de France , Duc de. 1340--1416, French prince, son of King John II; coregent (1380--88) for Charles VI and a famous patron of the arts
References in classic literature ?
They rested awhile, and finding berries ate them, then walked again.
Such was the region the Nautilus was now visiting, a perfect meadow, a close carpet of seaweed, fucus, and tropical berries, so thick and so compact that the stem of a vessel could hardly tear its way through it.
He came up to the fence and extended a handful of straw- berries, for his gardening was as generous as it was enthusi- astic.
Then they flew away to the gardens, and soon, high up among the tree-tops, or under the broad leaves, sat the Elves in little groups, taking their breakfast of fruit and pure fresh dew; while the bright-winged birds came fearlessly among them, pecking the same ripe berries, and dipping their little beaks in the same flower-cups, and the Fairies folded their arms lovingly about them, smoothed their soft bosoms, and gayly sang to them.
But she has one thing in the drawer which she can venture to wear to-day, because she can hang it on the chain of dark-brown berries which she has been used to wear on grand days, with a tiny flat scent-bottle at the end of it tucked inside her frock; and she must put on her brown berries-- her neck would look so unfinished without it.
green guavas, seeds, and berries were flying about in every direction, and during this dangerous state of affairs I was half afraid that, like the man and his brazen bull, I should fall a victim to my own ingenuity.
Hither the tribes from the mouth of the Columbia repaired with the fish of the sea-coast, the roots, berries, and especially the wappatoo, gathered in the lower parts of the river, together with goods and trinkets obtained from the ships which casually visit the coast.
The Himalayan black bear, moody and suspicious--Sona, who has the V-shaped white mark under his chin--passed that way more than once; and since the Bhagat showed no fear, Sona showed no anger, but watched him, and came closer, and begged a share of the caresses, and a dole of bread or wild berries.
His scanty sustenance was supplied by the berries and other spontaneous products of the forest.
Then he wandered quite blind about the forest, ate nothing but roots and berries, and did naught but lament and weep over the loss of his dearest wife.
They were sombre blues, opaque like a delicately carved bowl in lapis lazuli, and yet with a quivering lustre that suggested the palpitation of mysterious life; there were purples, horrible like raw and putrid flesh, and yet with a glowing, sensual passion that called up vague memories of the Roman Empire of Heliogabalus; there were reds, shrill like the berries of holly -- one thought of Christmas in England, and the snow, the good cheer, and the pleasure of children -- and yet by some magic softened till they had the swooning tenderness of a dove's breast; there were deep yellows that died with an unnatural passion into a green as fragrant as the spring and as pure as the sparkling water of a mountain brook.
Early in my childhood I learned that nuts came from the grocer, berries from the fruit man; but before ever that knowledge was mine, in my dreams I picked nuts from trees, or gathered them and ate them from the ground underneath trees, and in the same way I ate berries from vines and bushes.