adrenergic

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Related to beta-adrenergic: beta-adrenergic receptors

adrenergic

[‚ad·rə′nər·jik]
(physiology)
Describing the chemical activity of epinephrine or epinephrine-like substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other Concomitant Therapy: Although specific interaction studies were not performed, PROSCAR was concomitantly used in clinical studies with a-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, analgesics, anti-convulsants, beta-adrenergic blocking agents, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, cardiac nitrates, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), benzodiazepines, H2 antagonists and quinolone antiinfectives without evidence of clinically significant adverse interactions.
Caution is advised in co-administration of other beta-adrenergic agents, beta-receptor blocking agents, and non-potassium sparing diuretics.
4] and on the effect on labour of beta-adrenergic blocking with propranolol by Cilliers et al.
The new era of oral beta-adrenergic agonists is promising better control of OAB symptoms with less side effects than anticholinergics.
Aminophylline increases the toxicity but not the efficacy of an inhaled beta-adrenergic agonist in the treatment of acute exacerbations of asthma.
6, 1981, issue of JAMA announced that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute had "taken the unusual step of curtailing" the Beta-Blocker Heart Attack Trial (BHAT) based on findings that treatment of patients with the beta-adrenergic blocking agent, propranolol, resulted in a 26% decrease in all-cause mortality and a 23% decrease in sudden death (JAMA 1982; 247:1707-14).
Many clinical drugs that against cardiovascular diseases have exhibited antioxidant effects; these drugs simultaneously inhibit endothelial adhesion molecule expression, such as aspirin, probucol, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma ligands, calcium channel blockers, beta-adrenergic blockers, etc.
Propanolol targets the beta-adrenergic receptors in the brain which help to create a strong emotional memory.
Guidelines recommend not to use beta-adrenergic receptor blockers for patients with an AMI caused by cocaine, because of risk of exacerbating coronary spasm (8).
Beta-adrenergic receptor modulation of adipocyte metabolism and growth.