bias error

bias error

[′bī·əs ‚er·ər]
(statistics)
A measurement error that remains constant in magnitude for all observations; a kind of systematic error.
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It illustrated the low bias error of Vaisala's methodology, which applies the latest advances in weather science to wind energy modeling.
The designer can use this data to identify additional tube lengths required to reduce bias error associated with the meter station design.
A bias error vector b occurs in the dynamic model at epoch s, and the dynamic model at arbitrary epoch is expressed as
Bias error transforms a single result into a band of results, resulting from multiplying the single result by the positive and negative percentages of bias error.
An additional measurement should be carried out where transducers were placed against each other with no gap in order to compensate the ToF bias error caused by signal propagation in electronics, cabling and ultrasonic transducers.
The mean bias error (MBE) from models based on short data sets (one month) varied from -15% to 40% in their study.
There are two calibration criteria to specify the validity of the calibrated simulation model in ASHRAE Guideline 14-2002: Mean Bias Error (MBE) and Coefficient of Variation of the Root-Mean-Squared Error ([C.
0125 [degrees]/sec/LSB Initial Bias Error ([+ or -]1a) [+ or -]3 [degrees]/sec In-Run Bias Stability (1 [sigma]) 0.
It has a very low noise output and bias error, allowing greater navigation precision and for longer periods where GPS is not available because of tunnels and tall buildings.
Recently, a method was developed (Lee and Dexter 2005; Tan and Dexter 2005, 2006) that corrects for the bias error associated with employing a single-point sensor.
While table-3 gives the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias error (MBE).
Estimated values were compared with measured values in terms of root mean square error, mean bias error, mean absolute bias error, mean percentage error, and mean absolute percentage error.