bicameral

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bicameral

Politics (of a legislature) consisting of two chambers

bicameral

[bī′kam·ə·rəl]
(biology)
Having two chambers, as the heart of a fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
38) See generally George Tsebelis & Jeannette Money, Bicameralism (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997) at 17-26.
Bicameralism determines a second lecture of the law to be always performed by another assembly, which is meant to establish an accentuated critical perception.
John Adams's widely circulated "Thoughts on Government" (1776), which offered principles that should guide states in the drafting of new constitutions in the wake of their independence from Great Britain, was a highly influential work that defended the necessity of bicameralism to maintain liberty.
By way of contrast, the constitutional language creating the bicameralism requirement provides that "[e]very Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States.
The full listing of categories include the recommendations clause; bicameralism and presentment; the unitary executive, the president's authority over foreign affairs, commander-in- chief authority, the appointment clause, the president's ability to withhold information (limited to national security and classified information), the president's ability to withhold information (not including national security matters), equal protection and due process, federalism, other unspecified separation of powers, First Amendment, the nondelegation doctrine, the opinions clause, article II, article III (case or controversy requirement), the Fourth Amendment, constitutional limits on judicial power, judicial independence, constitutional immunities, congressional aggrandizement (Bowsher v.
Levinson admits as much when, in calling for a new constitutional convention in Our Undemocratic Constitution, he writes "I can well imagine urging its members to retain the general structure of bicameralism even as they engage in the necessary reform of the specifics of our particular version of bicameralism.
In addition, the author examines a variety of constitutional and legal issues, from British and American bicameralism and the role of the U.
Testing against a large dataset of 280 elections, Hicken found substantial support for his proposition that horizontal centralization affects cross-district coordination, with bicameralism and reserve domains (reserved or appointed seats) as two important components that shape horizontal centralization.
At least four important institutional arrangements can be formulated along integrative consociational principles: bicameralism, duality of administrative local and national governance, mixed electoral system, and cross-cutting electoral districting.
legislative bicameralism to improving democratic deliberations and to
soft statutes in the sense that they do not satisfy the bicameralism and