biceps

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Related to biceps brachii: triceps brachii, brachioradialis, Brachialis

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
References in periodicals archive ?
Terminal bifurcation of the biceps brachii muscle and tendon: anatomic considerations and clinical implications.
Dalton PA, Stokes MJ (1991) Acoustic myography reflects force changes during dynamic concentric and eccentric contractions of the human biceps brachii muscle.
Spectral properties of electromyographic and mechanomyographic signals during isometric ramp and step contractions in biceps brachii.
Rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii.
Avulsion of the insertion of the biceps brachii tendon and its surgical treatment.
The surface EMG signal from the biceps brachii was recorded during all of the PRE and POST assessments.
The Biceps brachii, Triceps brachii, Soleus, Tibialis, Gastronemius muscle were disected and weighed.
Key trigger point Associated satellite trigger point sternocleidomastoid temporalis, masseter upper trapezius temporalis, masseter scalene deltoid, extensor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis splenius capitis temporalis supraspinatus deltoid, extensor carpi radialis infraspinatus biceps brachii pectoralis minor flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris latissimus dorsi triceps brachii, flexor carpi ulnaris serratus posterior superior triceps brachii, extensor digitorum communis, extensor carpi ulnaris quadratus lumborum gluteus maximus, piriformis piriformis hamstrings hamstrings gastrocnemius, soleus
Incidental finding on MRI was splitting of the long head of the biceps brachii at the bicipital groove and reattachment at lower level close to musculotendinous junction.
For example, EMG Mwaves from the biceps brachii were judged to be "very reproducible" with a VR of 0.
Subscapularis was chosen due to the ease of isolated palpation (Magarey and Jones, 2003b), and the ability it gives to simultaneously feel for unwanted contraction in pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, or biceps brachii.
The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of percutaneous neuromuscular stimulatory (PNS) pulse duration on whole muscle contractile properties of the human biceps brachii muscle as measured by a laser-based mechanomyographic (MMG) technique.