biceps

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Related to biceps femoris: quadriceps femoris

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
References in periodicals archive ?
Briefly, biceps femoris muscle (10 g each) was homogenized with 50 mL of distilled water and filtered through Whatman filter paper (No.
Female rmsEMG vastus lateralis and biceps femoris values decreased in T1 and T2 phases during 1-10 and 90-100 jumps (P < 0.
Muscle activity of the quadriceps femoris (mean value of rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and medialis) and ham-strings (mean value of biceps femoris and semitendinosus) with vibration peak amplitude of 1.
The upper, lateral end of popliteus is said to be best palpated as it crosses the knee joint just above the head of the fibula, between the tendon of biceps femoris and the lateral head of gastrocnemius (Travell and Simons 1999) (Figures 3 and 4).
The current case is unique because the tumor mass was located in the biceps femoris with no macroscopic or microscopic association with large vessels.
The biceps femoris has two heads: the long head and short head.
It has been reported that via its attachment to the sacrotuberous ligament, the long head of the biceps femoris muscle is capable of influencing the motion or stability of the sacroiliac joint.
Also, have your doctor check for a tight biceps femoris muscle, which is associated with a lumbo-pelvic dysfunction.
Additionally, EMG was recorded from the gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris during the last 15 seconds of each 5-minute stage.
66 (1) Biceps femoris, semitendinosus, adductor, semimembranosus and quadriceps.
Surface EMG signals were collected from GM, biceps femoris (BF), medial gastrocnemius (MG), rectus femoris (RF), TA, and erector spinae (ES) (at T9) bilaterally.
After arthroscopy was performed, the knee was flexed to 90[degrees], and the interval was developed between the iliotibial band and the biceps femoris.