bile acid


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bile acid

[′bīl ′as·əd]
(biochemistry)
Any of the liver-produced steroid acids, such as taurocholic acid and glycocholic acid, that appear in the bile as sodium salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Title: Impact of NGM282 on the Incidence and Severity of Pruritus in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Patients and Correlations with Liver Chemistries and Serum Bile Acids (Poster 627)Session: Poster Session I - PBC/PSC and Other Cholestatic Disease, Exhibition HallPresenter: Marlyn Mayo, M.
Psyllium, which belongs to a class of gel-forming soluble fibers, disrupts the absorption or metabolizing of cholesterol by binding, entrapping, absorbing or otherwise interfering with the reabsorption of bile acids across the intestinal lumen.
In this study, the expression of genes involved in bile acid transport and homeostasis in liver and ileum were determined (Figure 4J-K).
It blocks bile acid reabsorption in the terminal ileum and
Preclinical models demonstrate that SHP625 is a potent, selective minimally absorbed inhibitor of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.
Gut microbiota regulates bile acid metabolism by reducing the levels of taurobeta-muricholic acid, a naturally occurring FXR antagonist.
05 mg/kg of jatrorrhizine on Mesocricetus auratus (Syrian golden hamsters) exhibited significant decrease in TC, TG, and LDL-c levels by 20%, 43%, and 19%, respectively, and increase in HDL-c and total bile acids (TBA) content in feces (p < 0.
Bile acids are the main functional component of bile secretions, which play a significant role in the emulsification of dietary lipids, whilst also acting as signalling molecules in the host.
However, the relationship between the physico-chemical properties of CS-fatty acid complexes preparations and their potential interaction with bile acids has seldom been referred, although the information is critical in the production and utilization of such hypolipidemic complexes.
PNALD is an umbrella term that encompasses several conditions, including cholestasis, which results from a buildup of excess bile acids in the liver, and steatosis, which--as its "fatty liver" nickname implies--occurs when there is too much fat in the liver.
In light of these findings, the interesting possibility is that ursodeoxycholic acid, used as a therapeutic bile acid in cholestatic disorders, may have antimycobacterial effects, but in vitro studies will be required to explore this.
The archaeal cholesterol hydroxylase activity indicating bile acid synthesis were increased [8].