billow


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billow

1. a large sea wave
2. a large atmospheric wave, usually in the lee of a hill
References in periodicals archive ?
I also felt it was important for the Billow to have a multitude of uses for women to appreciate long term.
On the whole, Birkin convincingly presents Billow in his ancillary, "reproductive" role: premiering Liszt's Sonata in B minor and Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto as pianist and 'Wagner's music dramas and Johannes Brahms's revised First Symphony as conductor; establishing the Berlin Gesellschaft.
At Meiningen in Thuringia--which town, when Billow arrived in 1880, dwelt in such soporific circumstances that it had a grand total of five cabs and no restaurants--he took over the local orchestra and turned it from a third-rate ensemble of purely local interest into a stunningly accomplished group that evoked an eighteenth-century British visitor's description of Mannheim's band as "an army of generals.
It turns out, a curtain billows and clings because a shower stall is what engineers call a "driven cavity.
Under the Marco's Area Development agreement, Billow will be opening and sub franchising Marco's Pizza restaurants in the Vegas area.
Smoke began to billow from the National Express crosscountry Plymouth to Edinburgh service soon after it arrived at Newcastle Central Station just after 1.
Encompassed by the panorama of Paris, the restaurant under Pompidou's coloured ducting is a cool volume of silvery light in which enormous Arp-ian structures billow out of an aluminium floor, their gaping mouths glowing with coloured luminance.
These united molecules sometimes billow to form stable fullerenes with 400 or more carbon atoms, he and his colleagues report in the Sept.
columns of smoke billow from the blaze at the scrap metal firm.
1 -- color) Darkened, ominous clouds of smoke billow up from the Lake Piru fire, here framed by the landscape of Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia.
Bubbles do most of their damage not when they burst but when they billow, according to a new study by You Lung Chen and Jacob Israelachvili at the University of California, Santa Barbara.
Their histrionics, straight out of the 1940s, are mitigated by their sincerity and absolute commitment to the material, As Spessivtseva (or the "Ballerina," as she is called in the program), Elena Kuzmina plays the mad scenes with searing pathos and the love scenes with great rushes of passion; she has a gift for the grand gesture, for the sweep of a skirt or the billow of a scarf, for heightening the theatricality of even trivial events.