bimah


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bema

1. A transverse space in a church a few steps above the floor of the nave and aisles, and separating them from the apse.
2. In a synagogue, a raised pulpit from which the Torah (Holy Bible) is read.
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And when I come to the bimah, I want to be able to sing in my song, in my soul, let it be.
Marzouk told Lurie he had first seen the Codex as a child at the Moussa al Dar'i on Yom Kippur, when it was placed on the bimah and the congregation filed past it.
He ascended the bimah ready to chant his Torah portion and join the generations of thirteen-year-old Jewish males who had successfully negotiated this ritual passage to manhood.
Awarding contracts for project controlling and quality assurance in the organizational reform of the Institute for Federal Real Estate (BImA)Object of the contract is performance of project monitoring (Work Package 1), quality assurance (Work Package 2), the Change / acceptance management (work package 3) and the Ad Hoc Advisory (Work Package 4) in the Feinkonzeptions- and implementation phase in accordance with the PRINCE2 -Projektmanagementansatz the bimah in the project Reform of the organization BImA.
The first restoration project he did at the synagogue was of its bimah -- the raised platform in the sanctuary where the Torah is read.
This would obviate the need for women to go up to the bimah in the men's section.
His interpretations of popular and liturgical music raised the audience's fervor so that many people were snaking their way and dancing through the aisles and on the bimah of Ohav Shalom's sanctuary.
Quriyat, June 23 (ONA) A campaign will begin in the Wilayat of Quriyat tomorrow (Thursday) to clean up the beaches and the Omani environment in villages of Daghmar, Dhabab, Bimah and Fins under the supervision of the Environment and Climate Affairs Ministry.
His eight-year-old son was often called upon to mount the bimah at shabbat prayer in the synagogue to deliver the scholarly sermon, the d'var Torah when his father was indisposed.
The wooden canopied bimah was not in the middle of the shul, but--in Sephardic fashion--just to the right of the entrance doorway.
Intricately carved, gilded wood adorned the bimah (pulpit) on one end of the rectangular room; at the other end, the aron, the cabinet where the Torahs (Hebrew Bible scrolls) are stored, was constructed of the same gilded wood.