bind


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bind

1. another word for bine
2. Music another word for tie
3. Fencing a pushing movement with the blade made to force one's opponent's sword from one line into another
4. Chess a position in which one player's pawns have a hold on the centre that makes it difficult for the opponent to advance there

BIND

bind

(1) To link, join, connect or associate one element with another as in the following examples.

(2) To link subroutines in a program. Applications are often built with the help of many standard routines or object classes from a library, and large programs may be built as several program modules. Binding puts the pieces together. Symbolic tags are used by the programmer in the program to interface to the routine. At binding time, the tags are converted into actual memory addresses or disk locations. See linker and bindings.

(3) To link any element, tag, identifier or mnemonic with another so that the two are associated in some manner. For example, key bindings link a physical keyboard key to a numeric code that is generated when pressed. See alias and map.

(4) (BIND) (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) The most widely used DNS server software. The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) offers a reference implementation of BIND, which is available at www.isc.org. See DNS.

(5) In a communications network, to establish a software connection between one protocol and another. Data flows from the application to the transport protocol to the network protocol to the data link protocol and then onto the network. Binding the protocols creates the internal pathway. See OSI model.


Binding Protocols in Windows
This Windows Network control panel shows bindings for the network and the modem. The NetBEUI and TCP/IP protocols are bound to the Ethernet adapter data link protocol for a LAN connection, and TCP/IP is also bound to the dial up adapter for Internet connection via modem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each receptor binds to more man one odor molecule, Willie each odor molecule binds to more than one receptor, "It's the overall pattern of the response of all the receptors that the brain interprets as a smell," says chemist Kenneth S.
Here again, loose cable winds off the winch drum, gets tangled and binds.
Currently, the staff consists of 12 database curators who identify, analyze and record protein interactions in BIND and 29 software developers.
For example, no Mosaic law is mentioned explicitly in 22:15-22, but the question of paying taxes to Caesar turns on an interpretation of the biblical prohibition against idolatry: one might bind that prohibition to forbid offering tribute to a man who claims to be a god; Jesus appears to loose it on the ground that a person who does not recognize Caesar's divinity may regard the "payment" as a meaningless act.
That double subunit binds to and activates many enzymes that carry out a cellular response, such as mediating pain relief, explains Smrcka.
I am very pleased by this financing that reflects the value that the BIND team has created with our platform and pipeline of Accurin therapeutics, including BIND-014 for cancer treatment.
The screening technique, developed by Schmidt's MIT collaborator Angela Belcher, was originally designed to screen for peptides that bind to semiconductor particles.
Over the past three years, the BIND targeted nanoparticle platform has demonstrated the potential to have major impact in pharmaceutical medicine, which goes far beyond what could be accomplished with liposomes, and these liposome products treat major diseases and generate revenue in excess of $1.
A protein found on red blood cells in sickle-cell disease binds these cells to blood vessel walls, disrupting circulation, a new study suggests.
PEC's technology offers the opportunity to overcome the challenges associated with developing DNA-binding drugs including making molecules that bind tightly and specifically to the target DNA sequence, effectively delivering these molecules to the desired target and assuring long-term safety of treatment.
In particular, he and other investigators have begun to create strands of RNA that can target and bind to specific small molecules, much as the proteins known an antibodies do.