binomial random variable

binomial random variable

[bī¦nō·mē·əl ‚ran·dəm ′ver·ē·ə·bəl]
(statistics)
A random variable, parametrized by a positive integer n and a number p in the closed interval between 0 and 1, whose range is the set {0, 1, …, n} and whose value is the number of successes in n independent binomial trials when p is the probability of success in a single trial.
References in periodicals archive ?
n] is distributed like a binomial random variable on n independent trials with rate of success q in each.
Let X be a binomial random variable with parameters n and p, where p denotes the defect level of process, and let [?
Here and in what follows Bin(m) denotes a binomial random variable with parameters m and p = 1/2.
The above proof is typical for our arguments : we will condition, use (4), compute an expectation involving a function of a binomial random variable, and finally use (5) to reduce the length of the tableaux by one.
The relevant expectation involving a binomial random variable is isolated in the following lemma (observe that b - 1 and c - 0 gives the property used in the proof of Proposition 3).
The relevant property of a binomial random variable is
We will need the following property of a binomial random variable.
2008, "Ordering comparison of negative binomial random variables with their mixtures", Statistics and Probability Letters.
2003, "Stochastic comparisons of Poisson and binomial random variables with their mixtures", Statistics and Probability Letters.