bioavailability

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bioavailability

[‚bī·ō·ə‚vāl·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(physiology)
The extent and rate at which a substance, such as a drug, is absorbed into a living system or is made available at the site of physiological activity.
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PHI Group plans to use the combined enhanced bioavailable nutrient and natural symbiotic immune system to grow select medicinal plants for export.
Editor's Note : Bioavailable vitamin D includes that which is bound to albumin but not vitamin D binding protein.
According to Plandai, the new Diego Pellicer Gold cannabinoid extracts provides for efficient recovery of highly bioavailable and active antioxidants from live plant materials in a mainly nano particle form.
Plandai Biotechnology delivers highly bioavailable, phytonutrient rich extracts under the Phytofare trademark.
The bioavailable (non-SHBG-bound) fraction of testosterone and estradiol and the free fraction (non-SHBG and non-albumin-bound) of testosterone were calculated in accordance with the method described by Sodergard et al.
This could be a very important discovery because there's only a very small amount of soluble iron in the ocean and if plankton use the iron nanoparticles formed in clouds then the whole flux of bioavailable iron to the oceans needs to be revised," said Dr Zongbo Shi, lead author of the research from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds.
Recaldent, known for its ability to strengthen, remineralize and protect tooth enamel, remains bioavailable to remineralize teeth for up to three hours after chewing the new gum.
Investigators at the universities of Parma and Naples found that cooking often enhances the nutrition of vegetables because it softens them up, making their nutrients more bioavailable than in raw vegetables.
Named "Herald," it's the first commercial-quality barley that provides a greater proportion of its phosphorus in a bioavailable form that can be more readily absorbed and used by fish and nonruminant livestock, such as pigs.
In a sample of 1,413 adult men, concentrations of free and bioavailable testosterone in the low normal range were associated with diabetes independent of adiposity, reported Elizabeth Selvin, Ph.
This recommendation is based on total sulfur, not bioavailable sulfur.