biodegradable

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biodegradable

(of sewage constituents, packaging material, etc.) capable of being decomposed by bacteria or other biological means

Biodegradable

Waste material composed primarily of constituent parts that occur naturally, are able to be decomposed by bacteria or fungi, and are absorbed into the ecosystem. Wood, for example, is biodegradable, while plastics are not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Telles Natural Plastics are produced from renewable resources such as corn sugar using a fully biological fermentation process, producing a versatile range of biobased natural plastics with excellent durability in use but that also biodegrade benignly in a wide range of environments.
Previous 'green' plastics came under scrutiny based on whether or not a plastic can fully biodegrade and be absorbed by microorganisms.
Worn-out tires would biodegrade into the soil as humus and nutrients.
D Collection Biodegrades in 20 Years as Opposed to the Industry Average of 1,000 Years
Plastics with Reverte additives degrade and ultimately biodegrade slower than the rate specified in these standards.
This emblem assures users and composters that these products meet ASTM D6400-99 Specifications For Compostable Plastics and are designed to biodegrade swiftly and completely when composted.
People seem to think they biodegrade, but they are made of plastic and they stick around,'' Gerosa said.
It is estimated that normal plastic bags take up to a thousand years to biodegrade, if they ever fully biodegrade at all.
As a result, most municipal recycling centers do not accept PVC products, meaning that millions of CD jewel cases either take up room indefinitely in landfills, where they won't biodegrade, or are incinerated.
Sinclair says ECM masterbatch pellets fully biodegrade PE and PP products in nine months to five years, depending on the disposal conditions.
The majority of the Paper Mate Biodegradable pen and pencil components biodegrade in soil or home compost in about a year.
On the waste issue, polystyrene products, including cups, don't biodegrade well and, if incinerated, produce toxic ash.