bioengineering

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bioengineering

1. the design and manufacture of aids, such as artificial limbs, to rectify defective body functions
2. the design, manufacture, and maintenance of engineering equipment used in biosynthetic processes, such as fermentation

Bioengineering

The use of living plants, or a combination of living and nonliving materials, to stabilize slopes and drainage ways.

bioengineering

[‚bī·ō‚en·jə′nir·iŋ]
(engineering)
The application of engineering knowledge to the fields of medicine and biology.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, FDA reiterated this position as recently as November 2015 when it issued a final guidance permitting voluntary labeling for bioengineered and non-bioengineered foods.
reports the fully functional regeneration of a salivary gland that reproduces the morphogenesis induced by reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions through the orthotopic transplantation of a bioengineered salivary gland germ as a regenerative organ replacement therapy.
The programme also sheds light on the effects some bioengineered foods have had on humans and livestock, and why we haven't heard more about it.
Their bioengineered follicles showed restored hair cycles and piloerection through the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches.
The European Commission introduced new, non-binding guidelines on the co-existence of bioengineered and other crops in July 2010.
FDA has no basis for concluding that bioengineered foods differ from other foods in any meaningful or uniform way, or that, as a class, foods developed by the new techniques present any different or greater safety concern than foods developed by traditional plant breeding," says Richard Herndon, an FDA spokesperson.
The investigators performed histologic examinations of wound sites 2 to 6 weeks after placement of Graftskin (Organogenesis, Canton, MA), a bioengineered skin composed of bovine collagen, viable dermal fibroblasts, and viable keratinocytes.
Because FDA considers most GM foods to be substantially equivalent to their conventional counterparts, the agency again declined to require bioengineered products to undergo the same extensive premarket approval process required for food additives, or to require bioengineered products to be labeled.
Under current FDA policy, developers of bioengineered foods are expected to consult with the agency before marketing their products, so that all safety and regulatory questions can be addressed fully.
Grocery store aisles are the trenches in which the war over bioengineered or genetically modified (GM) foods is being fought.
Thick-skinned, bioengineered tomatoes survive the trip to market better.
North American sales of bioengineered crops are $200 million a year and growing.