bioinorganic chemistry

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bioinorganic chemistry

[‚bī·ō‚in·ȯr¦gan·ik ′kem·ə·strē]
(biochemistry)
The application of the principles of inorganic chemistry to problems of biology and biochemistry. Also known as inorganic biochemistry; metallobiochemistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemists mostly in the US discuss inorganic and bioinorganic spectroscopy, 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy in chemistry and biology, magnetochemical methods and models, cryoadiolysis as a method for mechanistic studies, absolute chiral structures of inorganic compounds, the flash photolysis and chemistry of transients and excited states, using high pressure to elucidate inorganic and bioinorganic reaction mechanisms, chemical kinetics as a mechanistic tool, heavy atom isotope effects as probes of small molecule activation, and computational studies of reactivity in transition metal chemistry.
The bioinorganic chemistry and associated immunology of chronic beryllium disease.
Molecular understanding of aluminum bioinorganic chemistry in relevance to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.
Bioinorganic chemistry: inorganic elements in the chemistry of life.
Principles and applications in bioinorganic chemistry--VII", J.
It will also expose students to an important area in bioinorganic chemistry and reinforce the importance of metal ions and coordination compounds in biology.
3) Institute for Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Research Center Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany
In his 1997 research summary, he listed 19 published papers, primarily in the journals Analytical Chemistry, Bioinorganic Chemistry, Journal of Chemical Education, Journal of Molecular Biology, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and The Ohio Journal of Science.
With several texts on bioinorganic chemistry now available on the market, the new offering by Roat-Malone offers a distinct perspective.
The angiochip, as a hybrid bioinorganic device, would have several advantages: (a) controlled delivery of angiogenic factors useful for the development of both the exogenous and the endogenous microvasculature, (b) the ability to provide the implanted tissue with a fresh endothelial network from which further sprouting can proceed, (c) mechanical robustness required for implantation and retrieval using surgical means, (d) repeated use of the same device, (e) inclusion in the capsule's wall of miniature electronic components for remotely activated release of capsule content, and (f) compatibility with further incorporation of electronic biosensors for in situ diagnostics and for the individualized administration of angiogenic therapy.