biological constraint

biological constraint

[¦bī·ə¦läj·ə·kəl kən′strānt]
(psychology)
In learning theory, the observation that certain behaviors are more easily learned by some organisms than by others.
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In turn, such a biological constraint might have either (i) a developmental origin, thus applying directly to [alpha], [rho], [delta], or (ii), an adaptive origin, directly applying to any of E, K, and D and, consequently affecting only indirectly, [alpha], [rho], and [delta] (through the relationships (1)).
58) As with disability or gender, this supposed "accommodation" can appear unjustified because the "different" functioning of sexual orientation appears to involve contested individual, cultural, and moral choices rather than simply biological constraint.
We will consider the biological constraint of fertility and its implications in the last part of this section.
According to Jaenisch (in a personal communication with the author following the hearing), faulty reprogramming does not create the same difficulties in differentiated cells derived from stem cells because in stem cell research (1) only cell lines, not whole organisms, are created, so that there is less of a biological constraint to activate their developmental program, and (2) appropriate stem cells can be selected for use from those in culture, in contrast to reproductive cloning, where little nor no selection is possible.
This pattern stems from a universal biological constraint, the researchers argue.
Weeds are serious biological constraint to rice production and greatest competition due to them occurs in dry direct seeded method of rice stand establishment.
hermonthica are major biological constraints to cereal production in most of sub-Saharan Africa and semi-arid tropical regions of Asia.
Here Herold quotes from a story I did for reason in 2004: "Nothing could be more natural to human beings than striving to liberate ourselves from our biological constraints," I wrote.
The human auditory system has biological constraints analogous to those of the human articulatory system.
Geneticist David Suzuki said the problem is that usually geneticists follow the inheritance ofgenes what biotechnology allows us to do is to take this organism and move it horizontally into a totally unrelated species without regard to the biological constraints it's very bad science.
Combining evolutionary biology and psychology, physical and cultural anthropology, sociology and pedagogical approaches, these essays range from the study of laughter and its role in human organizations to anthropological conceptions of self (with some emphasis on the anthropologists' own selves, from the cultural norms of incest to the role of consumerism in today's society, both biological constraints on and the "changing nature" of human nature itself.
Thus, the diagram can be said to simplify--for the sake of illustration--a progression from biological constraints to culture that is, in fact, anything but linear.