biological invasion

biological invasion

[‚bi·ə¦läj·i·kəl in′vā·zhən]
(ecology)
The process by which species (or genetically distinct populations), with no historical record in an area, breach biogeographic barriers and extend their range.
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2010: Biological invasion of European tomato crops by Tuta absoluta: ecology, geographic expansion and prospects for biological control.
These countries have had very little international trade, which limits opportunities for biological invasion.
Mary's College of California) offer a comprehensive introduction to the processes and patterns of biological invasion by non-native species.
Scientific schematic line drawings of fish and mollusks reference the biological invasion known as the Lessepsian migration, wherein species from the Red Sea migrated to the Mediterranean following the construction of the Suez Canal, causing an enduring change in the fauna of the eastern Mediterranean.
Essentially what we found is that this biological invasion has the capacity to degrade air quality, and in all likelihood over time lead to increases in air pollution, increases in health problems caused by that air pollution, and decreases in agricultural productivity," said Lerdau.
Peretti, "Nativism and Nature: Rethinking Biological Invasion," Environmental Values 7 (1998): 188.
Simply put, your aquarium may be a source of biological invasion and causing genetic pollution among local fish varieties.
Recent biological invasion may hasten invasional meltdown by accelerating historical introductions.
Depleted uranium is a biological invasion of privacy," said CPT supporter Bill Arnold.
6) The Convention on Biological Diversity ("CBD") reflects the international consensus in response to the potential irreversible harm created by biological invasion.
We also consider the implications when households self-protect by allocating income to reduce the potential damages from a biological invasion.

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