biological oceanography


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Related to biological oceanography: Geological oceanography, Physical oceanography

biological oceanography

[¦bī·ə¦läj·ə·kəl ‚ō·shə′näg·rə·fē]
(oceanography)
The study of the flora and fauna of oceans in relation to the marine environment.
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Ryther and Ketchum spent undue time and energy trying to define biological oceanography.
The largest we sunk was about 30 tons, and that was a gray whale, and very challenging," recalls Smith, a professor of biological oceanography at the University of Hawaii.
Never more at home than when he is hunkered down on an Antarctic ice sheet, Bangor University's senior lec-turer in marine biology and biological oceanography studies the sea ice that covers up to 7% of Earth.
1:40 A HALF CENTURY OF PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY IN THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BIGHT WITH EMPHASIS ON FISH SPECIES TEMPERATURE AYD ZOOPLANKTON.
He introduced methods for measuring the growth of plants in the sea, that revolutionised biological oceanography.
Smith Professor of Biological Oceanography and Professor of Botany and Zoology at Duke University.
in Biological Oceanography, his first issue of the quarterly NEON is on CLF's website (www.
Ramus, a professor of biological oceanography at Duke University in Durham, have put together an innovative project called FerryMon to use that state's extensive coastal ferry system to actively monitor water quality in the rivers and open waters of the sound.
In spite of their abundance in the upper reaches of the ocean, the plankton have escaped scientific scrutiny until now because they are minuscule and barely fluorescent -- characteristics that render them almost invisible to the epifluorescent microscope that has become the standard tool in biological oceanography within the last decade.
Dr Jorg Wiedenmann, Senior Lecturer of Biological Oceanography and Head of the University's Coral Reef Laboratory, who led the study says: "The beautiful pink and purple hues that are produced by the coral host are often evoked by chromoproteins; pigments that are biochemically related to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.
He begins with the origin of biological oceanography in Germany and Scandinavia during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, then traces the development of the field in Britain and the US from 1921 to 1960.
Ocean acidification will have widespread effects on marine ecosystems, but most of those effects are still unknown," says David Garrison, director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Biological Oceanography Program, which funded the research along with NSF's Chemical Oceanography Program.

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