biomimicry


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biomimicry

Imitating nature in man-made systems. One of the most notable examples is the Eastgate Center in Harare, Zimbabwe, a shopping center built in 1996 that was constructed using principles discovered in termite mounds in the desert. The termites maintain an almost perfectly uniform temperature for their food inside, even though outside temperatures range from near freezing at night to over 100 degrees (Fahrenheit) in the day. The even temperature is accomplished by continuously opening and closing a series of vents throughout the day. The Eastgate Center uses 10% of the energy of a traditional building to keep cool. See bionic.

Biomimicry

A new science that studies nature’s models and then imitates or takes inspiration from these designs and processes to solve human problems, e.g., a solar cell inspired by a leaf. The application of methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology. It uses an ecological standard to judge the rightness of our innovations. After 3.8 billion years of evolution, nature has learned what works, what is appropriate, and what lasts.
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Biomimicry is a new discipline that tries to learn from those geniuses, and take advice from them, design advice.
Originality/value: This study is a step forward in understanding the link between biomimicry and managerial concepts.
Thus, Rattner said, the way we teach science now is not a fit for biomimicry.
Table 1 Biomimicry and Design Lesson Overview Time: 120 minutes Lesson Purpose: Students will engage in a design challenge to create an aircraft design by learning and applying biomimicry principles and engineering design practices (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create, Improve).
The Biomimicry Institute, in partnership with the Ray C.
The Biomimicry Institute holds an annual Biomimicry Global Design Challenge aimed at promoting ideas on a theme that "balances immediate humanitarian concerns with potential global ecological effects.
Richard MacCowan, of Biomimicry UK, said: "One company has looked at sharkskin-inspired film on hospital surfaces.
Highlight the word biomimicry in the last paragraph on page 18.
Biomimicry is such a fascinating book that, with supporting materials, it could be the basis for an engaging new unit in the science curriculum.
Thibaudeau: Biomimicry is a holistic design philosophy that seeks sustainable solutions by emulating nature's patterns.
The core idea behind biomimicry is that we're looking to learn from animals, plants and microbes that are the original engineers," says Patrick Thibaudeau, Vice President of HGA Architects & Engineers, in the article.
Now, just over a decade later, it's fair to say that biomimicry has changed how many people think of both biology and technological innovation.