biomorph

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biomorph

[′bī·ō‚mȯrf]
(graphic arts)
An abstract form (painted, drawn, or sculpted) whose shape resembles that of a living organism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Matta seems to have arrived at a kind of elementary biomorphism on his own while still a student.
The figures, Culture (2008) and The Other Brother Part Two (2010), look like a blend of early modernist sculpture, mid-century biomorphism and garden topiary.
Yet the sculpture's biomorphism, as well as its persistent intrusion into the viewer's space, nevertheless encourages one to compare Cumul I to the scale of the human body, in which case the rising tumescent shapes seem bigger than anything a person could muster.
Fauve colour is combined with familiar images from his previous work, such as the dancers from the Barnes murals, in overcrowded compositions torn between abstraction and Surrealist biomorphism.
The same is true of the work of many of his younger associates, an oft-quoted statement by Borduas about individuality notwithstanding: "If I am certain I am in front of a Mousseau, it is because of unintentional plastic relationships that are inevitable and constant in his work, which my memory tells me are unique and particular to everything he makes" Sometimes, as in the Gorkyesque biomorphism of Borduas's earliest abstractions (and of some of the other Automatistes), the explanation can be found in common sources.
The rolling biomorphism of the form, in other words, is fundamentally unlike that of marble torsos smoothed under the touch of traditional sculptors from Phidias to Rodin or clay figures made sleek beneath the fingers of conventional modellers from the obscurity of prehistory to the present.
Holding the front gallery with their phantasmagoric dreamscapes, cartoon-laden biomorphism, and bitingly radioactive color, such works enact a slow burn, by turns optical and conceptual.
In making the work for which she has become known over the past ten years, Prieto has often used a computer as a preparatory tool to generate idiosyncratic compositions that oscillate between latter-day biomorphism and a more self-contained, purely abstract vision.
In retrospect, the erotic biomorphism that recurs throughout O'Neill's sculptures, collage-drawings, and (especially, early) films seems to have emerged from his 1961 Atlantic Auto Wrecking Series photographs: A pair of mismatched oblong fenders with almond-shaped headlights, for example, reappears as dark ovals in the high-contrast ending of his first film, By the Sea (made with Robert Abel, 1963), in the twin orbs that open 7362, and in the oscillating circles of Two Sweeps (1979).
The most interesting kind of painting I've seen exhibited in the past several years has possessed the malignancy of Marti's work, combining the slick surfaces of glossy digital reproduction with a groundless space redolent of the Internet: It is an art in which biomorphism meets crystalline geometries.
Alt oon's Gorkyesque biomorphism holds up well, as does Bell's glass box (although one of the bigger ones without images on the surface would have been better).
Certainly the colorful biomorphism of Tarsila and the cartoonish narratives of Jean Helion or William Copley strike a chord with Dunham's recent painting.