bionic


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bionic

1. of or relating to bionics
2. (in science fiction) having certain physiological functions augmented or replaced by electronic equipment

bionic

A machine that is patterned after principles found in humans or nature; for example, robots. It also refers to artificial devices implanted into humans replacing or extending normal human functions. See biomimicry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previous small scale studies of the bionic eye have demonstrated no adverse effects.
The family is due to take Alan to the London Prosthetic Clinic next month to assess the best type of bionic hand called the iLimb ultra.
Suddenly I could feel something I'd not been feeling for nine years DENNIS SORENSEN ON ASTONISHING BIONIC HAND
AMAZING Andrew shows off his bionic arm and grips an egg
He was born without a left hand and has an advanced bionic one which cost PS30,000.
The incredible piece of technology will feature in the Channel 4 documentary How to Build a Bionic Man.
The C4 programme's presenter is Dr Bertolt Meyer, a social psychologist from Switzerland who himself has a 30,000-pound bionic limb after being born without a left hand.
A passionate technology fan, Ms Ashworth was motivated to make a contribution to the bionic eye research program.
National charity Deafness Research UK's award-winning Bionic Ear roadshow will be visiting the Wrexham Science Festival on Thursday, July 26 to deliver interactive performances, designed to emphasise the importance of ear protection and ensure hearing health messages do not fall on deaf ears.
REN Luquan, CONG Qian, TONG Jin and CHEN Bingcong (2001) put forward Bionic electro-osmosis, a new method of reducing soil adhesion to soil-engaging components or parts of terrain machines, is presented.
Emily says: "It meant the only option was a bionic ear.
What's fresh about the Bionic is that it's running a 1 GHz dual-core processor and connects to Verizon's 4G LTE network.