bioprinting

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bioprinting

Using a specialized 3D printer to create human tissue. Instead of depositing liquid plastic or metal powder to build objects, the bioprinter deposits living cells layer by layer. Although decades away, the goal is to replace donor organs and their ongoing rejection issue with organs 3D printed from a patient's own cells. In the meantime, being able to routinely print tissue that can replace damaged areas in an organ is expected to materialize on a large scale. See tissue engineering.

Early Results
In 2002, Professor Makoto Nakamura of the University of Toyama, Japan determined that human cells were the same size as the ink droplets in an inkjet printer. In 2008, using a modified inkjet printer, Nakamura created a double-walled tube similar to a human blood vessel. In 2013 Cornell University printed ear cartilage that, after implantation, is expected to grow like normal tissue. Also in 2013, San Diego, CA-based Oragnovo printed tiny human liver samples. When subjected to diseases and drugs, the samples behave more like real organs than the commonly used 2D cultures and can determine a drug's efficacy before engaging in clinical trials. See organ on a chip and 3D printing.
References in periodicals archive ?
BIOLIFE4D's bioprinter is designed to have an advanced and specialized form of 3D printing.
They were then expanded and encapsulated in a composition of nanofibrillated cellulose and printed into a structure using a 3D bioprinter.
The bioprinter is priced at USD39,000 and the first delivery is expected in spring 2017.
SE3D is an EdTech startup, funded by the National Science Foundation, specializing in science education courseware and desktop 3D bioprinters for K9-14.
As part of the Methuselah's University 3D Bioprinter Programme, Methuselah is donating at least USD500,000 in direct funding to be divided among several institutions for Organovo bioprinter research projects.
Researchers using a bioprinter, described Monday in Nature Biotechnology, say that they've found a way to manufacture living muscle, bone and cartilage.
His laboratory built the PrintAlive Bioprinter, which netted his research team the 2014 James Dyson Award for Canada, a design award that recognizes university student invention.
In this part application of bioprinter in the different field of tissue engineering is being discussed.
The tissue will also be used to study disease advancement, Murphy said and the tissue will be printed on the company's NovoGen MMX Bioprinter, which works much like an ink printer, except that it lays down living cells layer-by-layer.
While the bioreactors noted earlier provide researchers with advanced capabilities for growing biological samples using mostly traditional bioresearch processes, the Bioprinter from Organovo, San Diego, Calif.
The blood vessels were created through the use of the NovoGen MMX Bioprinter, Organovo's proprietary platform for the creation of 3D tissue constructs.